History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 127
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<​June 20​> I must be sure and be at his house by nine o’clock in the morning, if not, I must either get out of , or be served the same sauce as the Mormons; he gave me to understand they were going to make a total destruction of tomorrow, and I had better get out of it. He then talked about Joseph Smith, when I replied I understood Joseph Smith had a fair trial, and was bound over to the Supreme Court; he said if he is or is not, we do not care; it is illegally done, and he should go ahead— he should gather the troops, and there would be 2,000 men landed tomorrow from ; he said they were volunteers, they should meet next day at , and then go against Joseph Smith and demolish the City of ; for have him at any rate they would. He was in a very great passion, and let out a great many oaths and other things that I have not mentioned. In consequence of their threats, and to save our lives, we were obliged to leave our homes in a very stormy night, and had to cross a dangerous stream that was swollen by the rain, and was unable to protect myself from great sufferings and hardships, and came to the City of for protection.
Obadiah Bowen.
“Subscribed and sworn to this 20day of June, 1844, before me
L. S.
, Justice of the Peace.”
Also the affidavit of :— [HC 6:513]
Hancock County,)
City of .)
“June 20th, 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the peace in and for the said , , of , in , and aforesaid, and being first duly sworn, deposeth and saith, that on Wednesday, June the 12th, at Green Plains, one Colonel came to your about sunrise, and ordered me out of the house that very day. I replied he was very hasty; he again ordered me out of the house, and said if I spoke a word he would put me out of the house immediately. I then took away part of my goods and left the house accordingly, because I was afraid to stay there another night. The next day I went back after the remainder of my property, and called at the house of Col. for some things belonging to me. When I arrived there, John Williams, the son of said , aged about 28 years, abused me for placing confidence in Joseph Smith and the people of ; he then took me by the back of my neck and pushed me away, and said he would not have such stuff in his house,; the second time he pushed me by the neck, and his foot to my back; he pushed me several times, and kicked me; again when in the street he kept kicking and pushing me, and abusing me with his tongue. I am sixty-one years old; I did not say anything to him to cause this abuse; but it was all on account of my believing that Joseph Smith and the people of would do nothing but what was according to law.
.
“Subscribed and sworn to this 20th day of June, 1844, before me,
L. S.
, Justice of the Peace.”
I had sent orders to Captain , Commander of the Company at , to come immediately with his company to and help to defend the place, and this morning my brother in law, William Mc. Leary [McCleary], informs me that when the letter was read to the company, refused to come, and said it was a foolish move, and [HC 6:514] objected to any of the company coming. The company were marshalled into line, when said if any of you go, not one will ever get to alive; when immediately my uncle stepped in front of the line and said “every man that goes at the call of the prophet shall go and return safe, and not a hair of his head [p. 127]
June 20 I must be sure and be at his house by nine o’clock in the morning, if not, I must either get out of , or be served the same sauce as the Mormons; he gave me to understand they were going to make a total destruction of tomorrow, and I had better get out of it. He then talked about Joseph Smith, when I replied I understood Joseph Smith had a fair trial, and was bound over to the Supreme Court; he said if he is or is not, we do not care; it is illegally done, and he should go ahead— he should gather the troops, and there would be 2,000 men landed tomorrow from ; he said they were volunteers, they should meet next day at , and then go against Joseph Smith and demolish the City of ; for have him at any rate they would. He was in a very great passion, and let out a great many oaths and other things that I have not mentioned. In consequence of their threats, and to save our lives, we were obliged to leave our homes in a very stormy night, and had to cross a dangerous stream that was swollen by the rain, and was unable to protect myself from great sufferings and hardships, and came to the City of for protection.
Obadiah Bowen.
“Subscribed and sworn to this 20day of June, 1844, before me
L. S.
, Justice of the Peace.”
Also the affidavit of :— [HC 6:513]
Hancock County,)
City of .)
“June 20th, 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the peace in and for the said , , of , in , and aforesaid, and being first duly sworn, deposeth and saith, that on Wednesday, June the 12th, at Green Plains, one Colonel came to your about sunrise, and ordered me out of the house that very day. I replied he was very hasty; he again ordered me out of the house, and said if I spoke a word he would put me out of the house immediately. I then took away part of my goods and left the house accordingly, because I was afraid to stay there another night. The next day I went back after the remainder of my property, and called at the house of Col. for some things belonging to me. When I arrived there, John Williams, the son of said , aged about 28 years, abused me for placing confidence in Joseph Smith and the people of ; he then took me by the back of my neck and pushed me away, and said he would not have such stuff in his house,; the second time he pushed me by the neck, and his foot to my back; he pushed me several times, and kicked me; again when in the street he kept kicking and pushing me, and abusing me with his tongue. I am sixty-one years old; I did not say anything to him to cause this abuse; but it was all on account of my believing that Joseph Smith and the people of would do nothing but what was according to law.
.
“Subscribed and sworn to this 20th day of June, 1844, before me,
L. S.
, Justice of the Peace.”
I had sent orders to Captain , Commander of the Company at , to come immediately with his company to and help to defend the place, and this morning my brother in law, William Mc. Leary [McCleary], informs me that when the letter was read to the company, refused to come, and said it was a foolish move, and [HC 6:514] objected to any of the company coming. The company were marshalled into line, when said if any of you go, not one will ever get to alive; when immediately my uncle stepped in front of the line and said “every man that goes at the call of the prophet shall go and return safe, and not a hair of his head [p. 127]
Page 127