History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 137
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<​June 22​> property which belongs to the Mr. Laws and others. There has been no property meddled with to my knowledge belonging to any person, except property we have purchased of the rightful owners. turned over some property to a Mr. Hicks to pay a debt. This I purchased of Mr. Hicks, and I am responsible to him for the [HC 6:526] amount. We have been especially careful to preserve the property of those who are exciting the public against us, inasmuch as we knew that every means would be used which could be invented to raise excitement, and we have appointed the police to watch this property, and see that no harm was done to it by any person as they had tried to fire their own building, and was detected in the act; the fire was extinguished by the policemen, and no property damaged.
“There have been no prisoners taken in this , neither any person held as hostage, only some who are residents of this place, who had broke the laws. No stranger has been interfered with, nor detained in the , under any circumstances.
“In haste I have the honor to remain
Dear Sir, Your most obedt. Servt.,
Joseph Smith Lieut. Gen. N. L.”
This letter was accompanied by other affidavits, and sent by , who was delegated to go in place of . He started at noon in company with of . [HC 6:527]
Legion met as usual, and after receiving instructions, were dismissed until 6 P. M, when they met again. At 7 P. M., I instructed to cause the regiments of the 2nd Cohort to turn out tomorrow and work by turns three or four hours each with intrenching tools, and to take the best measures in case of attack. I also gave orders that a standard be prepared for the nations.
arrived from this morning, having come at the request of the , who thought it not wisdom to have , and , and others of the City Council go to .
made the following affidavit:—
City of .)
On the 22nd day of June, 1844, came before me, , Clerk of the Mayor’s Court in said , Dr. , who after being duly sworn deposeth and saith, that while at on the 18th and 19th ins’t, I heard several persons, who had assembled together for warlike purposes (having their arms and one cannon with them) say that they were gathering together for the purpose of destroying the property of General Joseph Smith, or as they said ‘Joe Smith’, and his followers, and the City Council, with the exception of [HC 6:528] one, and finally said that they would destroy the town, and exterminate the Latter day Saints.
.
“Subscribed and sworn to before me this 22nd day of June, 1844.
, Clerk M. C.”
James Olive made the following affidavit:—
Hancock County,)
City of )
June 22nd, 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the Peace in and for said , James Olive, who being first duly sworn, deposeth and saith that on Friday afternoon the 21st ins’t, about 3 o’clock he was at his own house about two miles from Appanoose, in a southeasterly direction, he saw a four horse wagon with some men before it, all traveling towards Appanoose. They went about a quarter of a mile beyond my house, there met a two horse wagon, and a [p. 137]
June 22 property which belongs to the Mr. Laws and others. There has been no property meddled with to my knowledge belonging to any person, except property we have purchased of the rightful owners. turned over some property to a Mr. Hicks to pay a debt. This I purchased of Mr. Hicks, and I am responsible to him for the [HC 6:526] amount. We have been especially careful to preserve the property of those who are exciting the public against us, inasmuch as we knew that every means would be used which could be invented to raise excitement, and we have appointed the police to watch this property, and see that no harm was done to it by any person as they had tried to fire their own building, and was detected in the act; the fire was extinguished by the policemen, and no property damaged.
“There have been no prisoners taken in this , neither any person held as hostage, only some who are residents of this place, who had broke the laws. No stranger has been interfered with, nor detained in the , under any circumstances.
“In haste I have the honor to remain
Dear Sir, Your most obedt. Servt.,
Joseph Smith Lieut. Gen. N. L.”
This letter was accompanied by other affidavits, and sent by , who was delegated to go in place of . He started at noon in company with of . [HC 6:527]
Legion met as usual, and after receiving instructions, were dismissed until 6 P. M, when they met again. At 7 P. M., I instructed to cause the regiments of the 2nd Cohort to turn out tomorrow and work by turns three or four hours each with intrenching tools, and to take the best measures in case of attack. I also gave orders that a standard be prepared for the nations.
arrived from this morning, having come at the request of the , who thought it not wisdom to have , and , and others of the City Council go to .
made the following affidavit:—
City of .)
On the 22nd day of June, 1844, came before me, , Clerk of the Mayor’s Court in said , Dr. , who after being duly sworn deposeth and saith, that while at on the 18th and 19th ins’t, I heard several persons, who had assembled together for warlike purposes (having their arms and one cannon with them) say that they were gathering together for the purpose of destroying the property of General Joseph Smith, or as they said ‘Joe Smith’, and his followers, and the City Council, with the exception of [HC 6:528] one, and finally said that they would destroy the town, and exterminate the Latter day Saints.
.
“Subscribed and sworn to before me this 22nd day of June, 1844.
, Clerk M. C.”
James Olive made the following affidavit:—
Hancock County,)
City of )
June 22nd, 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the Peace in and for said , James Olive, who being first duly sworn, deposeth and saith that on Friday afternoon the 21st ins’t, about 3 o’clock he was at his own house about two miles from Appanoose, in a southeasterly direction, he saw a four horse wagon with some men before it, all traveling towards Appanoose. They went about a quarter of a mile beyond my house, there met a two horse wagon, and a [p. 137]
Page 137