History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 146
image
<​June 22​> as “you lie like hell” from a crown of persons present; these facts shew conclusively that he is under the influence of the mob spirit, and is designedly intending to place us in the hands of murderous assassins, and is conniving at our destruction; or else that he is to ignorant and stupid, that he does not understand the corrupt and diabolical spirits that are around him. [HC 6:542]
Elder gave the following account of his interview with the :—
“After waiting the ’s pleasure for some time we had an audience; but such an audience! He was surrounded by some of the vilest and most unprincipled men in creation; some of them had an appearance of respectability, but many of them lacked even that. and I believe were there, , and , , a lawyer from ; a mobocratic merchant from , , a number of his associates, and the ’s secretary, in all some fifteen or twenty persons, most of whom were recreant to virtue, honor integrity and everything that is considered honorable among men. I can well remember the feelings of disgust that I had in seeing the surrounded by such an infamous group, and on being introduced to men of so questionable a character; and had I been on private business, I should have turned to depart, and told the that, if he thought proper to associate with such questionable characters, I should beg leave to be excused, but coming, as we did, on public business, we could not of course consult our private feelings.
“We then stated to the , that in accordance with his request, General Joseph Smith had in response to his call, sent us to him as a committee of conference; that we were acquainted with most of the circumstances that had transpired in and about lately, and were prepared to give him the information; that moreover we had in our possession testimony and affidavits confirmatory of what we should say, which had been forwarded to him by General Joseph Smith; that communications had been forwarded to his by Merssrs , and others, some of which had not reached their destination; but of which we had duplicates with us. We then in brief related an outline of the diffiulties, and the course we had pursued from the commencement of the troubles, up to the present, and handing him the documents, respectfully submitted the whole. During our conversation and explanations with the , we were frequently rudely and impudently contradicted by the fellows he had around him, and of whom he seemed to take no notice.
“He opened and read a number of the documents himself, and as he proceeded, he was frequently interrupted by: ‘That’s a lie’— ‘That’s a God damned lie.’ ‘That’s an infernal falsehood’. ‘That’s a blasted lie’ &c. [HC 6:543]
“These men evidently winced on an exposure of their acts, and thus vulgarly, impudently and falsely repudiated them. One of their number, , addressed himself several times to me, while in conversation with the . I did not notice him until after a frequent repetition of his insolence, when I informed him, that my business at that time was with ; whereupon I continued
-[See Addenda * page 1.]- [HC 6:544] [p. 146]
June 22 as “you lie like hell” from a crown of persons present; these facts shew conclusively that he is under the influence of the mob spirit, and is designedly intending to place us in the hands of murderous assassins, and is conniving at our destruction; or else that he is to ignorant and stupid, that he does not understand the corrupt and diabolical spirits that are around him. [HC 6:542]
Elder gave the following account of his interview with the :—
“After waiting the ’s pleasure for some time we had an audience; but such an audience! He was surrounded by some of the vilest and most unprincipled men in creation; some of them had an appearance of respectability, but many of them lacked even that. and I believe were there, , and , , a lawyer from ; a mobocratic merchant from , , a number of his associates, and the ’s secretary, in all some fifteen or twenty persons, most of whom were recreant to virtue, honor integrity and everything that is considered honorable among men. I can well remember the feelings of disgust that I had in seeing the surrounded by such an infamous group, and on being introduced to men of so questionable a character; and had I been on private business, I should have turned to depart, and told the that, if he thought proper to associate with such questionable characters, I should beg leave to be excused, but coming, as we did, on public business, we could not of course consult our private feelings.
“We then stated to the , that in accordance with his request, General Joseph Smith had in response to his call, sent us to him as a committee of conference; that we were acquainted with most of the circumstances that had transpired in and about lately, and were prepared to give him the information; that moreover we had in our possession testimony and affidavits confirmatory of what we should say, which had been forwarded to him by General Joseph Smith; that communications had been forwarded to his by Merssrs , and others, some of which had not reached their destination; but of which we had duplicates with us. We then in brief related an outline of the diffiulties, and the course we had pursued from the commencement of the troubles, up to the present, and handing him the documents, respectfully submitted the whole. During our conversation and explanations with the , we were frequently rudely and impudently contradicted by the fellows he had around him, and of whom he seemed to take no notice.
“He opened and read a number of the documents himself, and as he proceeded, he was frequently interrupted by: ‘That’s a lie’— ‘That’s a God damned lie.’ ‘That’s an infernal falsehood’. ‘That’s a blasted lie’ &c. [HC 6:543]
“These men evidently winced on an exposure of their acts, and thus vulgarly, impudently and falsely repudiated them. One of their number, , addressed himself several times to me, while in conversation with the . I did not notice him until after a frequent repetition of his insolence, when I informed him, that my business at that time was with ; whereupon I continued
-[See Addenda * page 1.]- [HC 6:544] [p. 146]
Page 146