History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 164
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<​June 26​> copies of communications forwarded to ; also his letter of the 21st June <​which​> was sent by and Mr , and his letter of the 22nd, which was sent by and .
Marshall explained about giving passes to persons going in and out of the , and denied that any arrests had been made.
Marshalled the Legion
had no power any thing further
brought here
acted on the State of the Habeas Corpus, and referred to the trial before , which did not satisfy the feelings of the people in and about . The admitted that sufficient time had not been allowed by the posse for the Defendants to get ready or to gather their witnesses, and it can be very safely admitted that your statements are true, and was satisfied now that the people of had acted according to the best of their judgment.
said that it was very evident from the excitement created by Mr Smith’s enemies it would have been unsafe for him to come to , for under such circumstances he could not have had an impartial trial. [HC 6:578]
The said he came here to enforce the laws on all the people whether Mormons or not; and then expressed his feelings about the destruction of the “Expositor Press.”
Joseph Spoke of his imprisonment in , and of the shameful kidnapping of his witnesses, and their being thrust into prison to prevent them from giving their testimony in his favor.
spoke of the Constitution.
Joseph said we were willing to pay for the press, as he did not want the owners to suffer any loss by it, neither did he wish such a libellous paper to be published in . As for calling out the Nauvoo Legion; if it was intended to resist the Government of the it would be treason, but as they believed they were endeavoring to defend themselves, and had no such intention as to resist the Government it was all right.
10¼ A. M. The left, after saying that the prisoners were under his protection, and again pledging himself that they should be protected from violence, and telling them that if the troops marched the next morning to as he then expected, they should probably be taken along, in order to insure their personal safety; with how much sincerity may be seen by the following affidavits:
Territory of Utah) SS
Great Salt Lake County)
“Personally appeared before me, , Recorder of Great Salt Lake County, Alfred Randall, who deposes and says that about ten o’clock on the morning of the (26) twenty-sixth of <​day​> June one thousand eight hundred and forty four he was in , Hancock County, Illinois, and as the troops under Governor were in squads round the square, he went up to several of them, and heard one of the Soldiers say ‘when I left home I calculated to see old Joe dead before I returned’, when several others said ‘so did <​I​>’, ‘so did I,’ and ‘I’ll be damned if I don’t’ was the general reply. One fellow then [p. 164]
June 26
[HC 6:578]
10¼ A. M. The left, after saying that the prisoners were under his protection, and again pledging himself that they should be protected from violence, and telling them that if the troops marched the next morning to as he then expected, they should probably be taken along, in order to insure their personal safety; with how much sincerity may be seen by the following affidavits:
Territory of Utah) SS
Great Salt Lake County)
“Personally appeared before me, , Recorder of Great Salt Lake County, Alfred Randall, who deposes and says that about ten o’clock on the morning of the (26) twenty-sixth day June one thousand eight hundred and forty four he was in , Hancock County, Illinois, and as the troops under Governor were in squads round the square, he went up to several of them, and heard one of the Soldiers say ‘when I left home I calculated to see old Joe dead before I returned’, when several others said ‘so did I’, ‘so did I,’ and ‘I’ll be damned if I don’t’ was the general reply. One fellow then [p. 164]
Page 164