History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 167
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<​June 26​> hundred and fifty, William G. Sterrett, who being first duly sworn deposeth and saith, that on the twenty seventh day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty four, in the City of , County of Hancock, and State of Illinois, I heard , Governor of , address an assembly of several thousand citizens, gathered around the frame of a building situated at the corner of Water and Main Streets; he reproached the people in severe terms for the course they had taken in resisting the posse commitatus, and among other things said, ‘the retribution thereof will be terrible and you must make up your minds for it, I hope you will not make any more trouble, but be a law abiding people, for if I have to come again, it will be worse for you’.
“And your deponent further saith that about half past five in the afternoon, the said Governor and his guard visited the and the workshops on the Temple Block. Mr , one of the Building Committee of the sent me to watch them in and about the . I was close to the when one of his men called him to look at one of the oxen of the Font in the basement of the , that had part of one horn broken off; the stepped up to it, and laying his hand on it remarked, ‘this is the cow with the crumply horn, that we read of,’ one of the staff continued ‘that tossed the maiden all forlorn’ and they all had a laugh about it. Several of the horns were broken off the oxen by the ’s attendants; a man who stood behind me said ‘I’ll be damned, but I would like to take one of those horns home with me, to show as a curiosity, but it is a pity to break them off.’ [HC 6:589] After they had passed round the fort <​font​> one of them remarked, ‘This is a curious piece of workmanship, and it was a damned shame that they did not let Joe Smith finish it, so that we could have seen what sort of a finish he would have put on it, for it is altogether a different style of architecture from any building I have <​ever​> seen or read about’; another said ‘but he is dead by this time and he will never see this again.’ I replied ‘they cannot kill him, until he has finished his work’; the thereupon gave a very significant grin, when one of his suite who stood next to me, said ‘whether he has finished his work or not, by God he’ll not see this place again, for he’s finished before this time’. Another of his suite pulled out his watch and said ‘, it’s time we were off, we have been here too long already, whether you go or not. I’m going to leave, and that damned quick.’ The said ‘Yes it’s time for us to be going;’ they then all left the stone shop, mounted their horses, which were hitched near the , and went out of the towards , by way of Mullholland Street, taking with them one of the horns that the Company had knocked off. And further this deponent saith not
Wm G. Sterrett
“Sworn to and subscribed before me, the day and year first above written
G. S. L. County Recorder”
While Joseph was writing at the ’s desk William Wall stepped up, wanting to deliver a verbal message to him from his uncle, . He turned round to speak to Wall, but the guard refused to allow them any communication.
At noon Joseph wrote to , as follows:
Jail, June 26. 1844.
His Hon. , Dear Sir,
You will perceive by my date that [p. 167]
June 26 hundred and fifty, William G. Sterrett, who being first duly sworn deposeth and saith, that on the twenty seventh day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty four, in the City of , County of Hancock, and State of Illinois, I heard , Governor of , address an assembly of several thousand citizens, gathered around the frame of a building situated at the corner of Water and Main Streets; he reproached the people in severe terms for the course they had taken in resisting the posse commitatus, and among other things said, ‘the retribution thereof will be terrible and you must make up your minds for it, I hope you will not make any more trouble, but be a law abiding people, for if I have to come again, it will be worse for you’.
“And your deponent further saith that about half past five in the afternoon, the said Governor and his guard visited the and the workshops on the Temple Block. Mr , one of the Building Committee of the sent me to watch them in and about the . I was close to the when one of his men called him to look at one of the oxen of the Font in the basement of the , that had part of one horn broken off; the stepped up to it, and laying his hand on it remarked, ‘this is the cow with the crumply horn, that we read of,’ one of the staff continued ‘that tossed the maiden all forlorn’ and they all had a laugh about it. Several of the horns were broken off the oxen by the ’s attendants; a man who stood behind me said ‘I’ll be damned, but I would like to take one of those horns home with me, to show as a curiosity, but it is a pity to break them off.’ [HC 6:589] After they had passed round the font one of them remarked, ‘This is a curious piece of workmanship, and it was a damned shame that they did not let Joe Smith finish it, so that we could have seen what sort of a finish he would have put on it, for it is altogether a different style of architecture from any building I have ever seen or read about’; another said ‘but he is dead by this time and he will never see this again.’ I replied ‘they cannot kill him, until he has finished his work’; the thereupon gave a very significant grin, when one of his suite who stood next to me, said ‘whether he has finished his work or not, by God he’ll not see this place again, for he’s finished before this time’. Another of his suite pulled out his watch and said ‘, it’s time we were off, we have been here too long already, whether you go or not. I’m going to leave, and that damned quick.’ The said ‘Yes it’s time for us to be going;’ they then all left the stone shop, mounted their horses, which were hitched near the , and went out of the towards , by way of Mullholland Street, taking with them one of the horns that the Company had knocked off. And further this deponent saith not
Wm G. Sterrett
“Sworn to and subscribed before me, the day and year first above written
G. S. L. County Recorder”
While Joseph was writing at the ’s desk William Wall stepped up, wanting to deliver a verbal message to him from his uncle, . He turned round to speak to Wall, but the guard refused to allow them any communication.
At noon Joseph wrote to , as follows:
Jail, June 26. 1844.
His Hon. , Dear Sir,
You will perceive by my date that [p. 167]
Page 167