History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 13
image
<​May 8​> Joseph Smith; as he had no character he did not care what he did— he had nothing to lose by it. That was the substance of our conversation.’
sworn:—
‘I recollect a settlement of difficulties between and my brother Joseph, about which some of the court may recollect. I recollect asking forgiveness of the Lodge, when there were about sixty present. acknowledged that it was the truth, and that he was sorry, and had been a thousand times; he acknowledged his connexion with the woman on the hill: I did think he was with at the time. The statement of was, that he was guilty— he was sorry and asked forgiveness— he said he had seduced six or seven; he acknowledged it, and said if he was forgiven he would not be guilty any more. said he knew it was true— he was sorry and had been a hundred times. The very things that we had challenged him with he acknowledged. I told that it had better be settled; he said Joseph had accused him, and if his character was gone all was gone; he said he would settle it, and they went into the room. He did not deny any charge; he said he was sorry, that he wanted it buried, and it was agreed to do so. did not say anything about his sickness, but made those observations to him— that he had doctored him in the time of his sickness.’
“Cross-examined:
‘I asked if he did not tell that he had seduced a girl; he replied, “I told that I did seduce her, but I tell you I never did it; I told him so for my own notion of things.” I do not recollect of him saying that he had got a bad disorder with the French girl; he said he should not have been seduced if it had not been by <​for​> . When charged with them, said they were true— that they were alleged a hundred times; he said, “I will alter— I will save my character.” I have never heard from brother Joseph anything about his character; Joseph did not accuse him of anything before the police— he said had better take care. was a little dissatisfied, but that difference was settled; I was present. He said he would not receive any thing again from abroad— he would not take any steps by hearsay; he would come to him and tell him. There were several present when this took place.’
sworn— he recollected the conversation, but not very distinctly; but he did recollect that acknowledged to Joseph Smith that he was guilty of the charges preferred against him.
“Court adjourned for one hour and a half.
“Court met.
sworn:—
‘With regard to this case, I know nothing, but through a circumstance which occurred at . Elder came to my house to preach; he preached and was upholding the authorities of the Church very much; he came over here and apostatized the same day. I then came over and went to see him; I asked him why he had changed his mind so quick; he said he had seen affidavits of the guilt of Mr Smith; he told me was going about to the different conferences. I told him <​I thought​> he had better send some one else; his conduct was not the best, and I know of circumstances that were not right. Once I was a mate on a Steamboat, and was clerk; we had not much cabin; we had some females on board. I and another had given up our room to some ladies for the night; it was my watch, and I went into the cabin for my Buffalo robe about one o’clock in the night, when I saw him leaning over the berth where one of the ladies slept. This was in the night, and he had no business there; no gentleman had any [p. 13]
May 8 Joseph Smith; as he had no character he did not care what he did— he had nothing to lose by it. That was the substance of our conversation.’
sworn:—
‘I recollect a settlement of difficulties between and my brother Joseph, about which some of the court may recollect. I recollect asking forgiveness of the Lodge, when there were about sixty present. acknowledged that it was the truth, and that he was sorry, and had been a thousand times; he acknowledged his connexion with the woman on the hill: I did think he was with at the time. The statement of was, that he was guilty— he was sorry and asked forgiveness— he said he had seduced six or seven; he acknowledged it, and said if he was forgiven he would not be guilty any more. said he knew it was true— he was sorry and had been a hundred times. The very things that we had challenged him with he acknowledged. I told that it had better be settled; he said Joseph had accused him, and if his character was gone all was gone; he said he would settle it, and they went into the room. He did not deny any charge; he said he was sorry, that he wanted it buried, and it was agreed to do so. did not say anything about his sickness, but made those observations to him— that he had doctored him in the time of his sickness.’
“Cross-examined:
‘I asked if he did not tell that he had seduced a girl; he replied, “I told that I did seduce her, but I tell you I never did it; I told him so for my own notion of things.” I do not recollect of him saying that he had got a bad disorder with the French girl; he said he should not have been seduced if it had not been for . When charged with them, said they were true— that they were alleged a hundred times; he said, “I will alter— I will save my character.” I have never heard from brother Joseph anything about his character; Joseph did not accuse him of anything before the police— he said had better take care. was a little dissatisfied, but that difference was settled; I was present. He said he would not receive any thing again from abroad— he would not take any steps by hearsay; he would come to him and tell him. There were several present when this took place.’
sworn— he recollected the conversation, but not very distinctly; but he did recollect that acknowledged to Joseph Smith that he was guilty of the charges preferred against him.
“Court adjourned for one hour and a half.
“Court met.
sworn:—
‘With regard to this case, I know nothing, but through a circumstance which occurred at . Elder came to my house to preach; he preached and was upholding the authorities of the Church very much; he came over here and apostatized the same day. I then came over and went to see him; I asked him why he had changed his mind so quick; he said he had seen affidavits of the guilt of Mr Smith; he told me was going about to the different conferences. I told him I thought he had better send some one else; his conduct was not the best, and I know of circumstances that were not right. Once I was a mate on a Steamboat, and was clerk; we had not much cabin; we had some females on board. I and another had given up our room to some ladies for the night; it was my watch, and I went into the cabin for my Buffalo robe about one o’clock in the night, when I saw him leaning over the berth where one of the ladies slept. This was in the night, and he had no business there; no gentleman had any [p. 13]
Page 13