History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 203
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<​June​> which was the first intelligence of the murder which was received at . I think it [HC 7:27] very probable that the subsequent good conduct of the Mormons is attributable to the arrest of the messengers, and to the influence of this letter.
“Having made these arrangements, I departed for . On my road thither, I heard of a body of militia marching from Schuyler, and another from Brown. It appears that orders had been sent out in my name, but without my knowledge, for the militia of Schuyler county. I immediately countermanded their march, and they returned to their homes. When I arrived at , I found that Capt. Jonas had raised a company of one hundred men, who were just ready to march. By my advice they postponed their march, to await further orders. I arrived at on the morning of the 29th of June, about eight o’clock, and immediately issued orders, provisionally, for raising an imposing force, when it should seem to be necessary.
“I remained at for about one month, during which time a committee from waited on me, with a written request that I would expel the Mormons from the . It seemed that it never occurred to these gentlemen that I had no power to exile a citizen; but they insisted that if this were not done, their party would abandon the . This requisition was refused of course.
“During this time also, with the view of saving expense, keeping the peace, and having a force which would be removed from the prejudices in the country, I made application to the for five hundred men of the regular army, to be stationed for a time in , which was subsequently refused. [HC 7:28]
“During this time also, I had secret agents amongst all parties, observing their movements; and was accurately informed of every thing that was meditated on both sides. It appeared that the anti-Mormon party had not relinquished their hostility to the Mormons, nor their determination to expel them, but had deferred further operations until the fall season, after they had finished their summer’s work on their farms.
“When I first went to , and during all this difficult business, no public officer ever acted from purer or more patriotic intentions than I did. I was perfectly conscious of the utmost integrity in all my actions, and felt lifted up far above all mere party considerations. But I had scarcely arrived at the scene of action before the whig press commenced the most violent abuse, and attributed to me the basest motives. It was alleged in the Journal, and repeated in the other whig newspapers, that the had merely gone over to cement an alliance with the Mormons; that the leaders would not be brought to punishment, but that a full privilege would be accorded to them to commit crimes of every hue and grade, in return for their support of the democratic party. I mention this by way of complaint, for it is only the privilege of the minority to complain, but for its influence upon the people.
I observed that I was narrowly watched in all my proceedings by my whig fellow citizens, and was suspected of an intention to favor the Mormons. [p. 203]
June which was the first intelligence of the murder which was received at . I think it [HC 7:27] very probable that the subsequent good conduct of the Mormons is attributable to the arrest of the messengers, and to the influence of this letter.
“Having made these arrangements, I departed for . On my road thither, I heard of a body of militia marching from Schuyler, and another from Brown. It appears that orders had been sent out in my name, but without my knowledge, for the militia of Schuyler county. I immediately countermanded their march, and they returned to their homes. When I arrived at , I found that Capt. Jonas had raised a company of one hundred men, who were just ready to march. By my advice they postponed their march, to await further orders. I arrived at on the morning of the 29th of June, about eight o’clock, and immediately issued orders, provisionally, for raising an imposing force, when it should seem to be necessary.
“I remained at for about one month, during which time a committee from waited on me, with a written request that I would expel the Mormons from the . It seemed that it never occurred to these gentlemen that I had no power to exile a citizen; but they insisted that if this were not done, their party would abandon the . This requisition was refused of course.
“During this time also, with the view of saving expense, keeping the peace, and having a force which would be removed from the prejudices in the country, I made application to the for five hundred men of the regular army, to be stationed for a time in , which was subsequently refused. [HC 7:28]
“During this time also, I had secret agents amongst all parties, observing their movements; and was accurately informed of every thing that was meditated on both sides. It appeared that the anti-Mormon party had not relinquished their hostility to the Mormons, nor their determination to expel them, but had deferred further operations until the fall season, after they had finished their summer’s work on their farms.
“When I first went to , and during all this difficult business, no public officer ever acted from purer or more patriotic intentions than I did. I was perfectly conscious of the utmost integrity in all my actions, and felt lifted up far above all mere party considerations. But I had scarcely arrived at the scene of action before the whig press commenced the most violent abuse, and attributed to me the basest motives. It was alleged in the Journal, and repeated in the other whig newspapers, that the had merely gone over to cement an alliance with the Mormons; that the leaders would not be brought to punishment, but that a full privilege would be accorded to them to commit crimes of every hue and grade, in return for their support of the democratic party. I mention this by way of complaint, for it is only the privilege of the minority to complain, but for its influence upon the people.
I observed that I was narrowly watched in all my proceedings by my whig fellow citizens, and was suspected of an intention to favor the Mormons. [p. 203]
Page 203