History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 291
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<​August 1​> damned Mormons for they were stopped by a damned snow storm.
“After they had got some distance on their journey the company divided into three parts, the three brethren named fell in company with ; their provisions gave out, and after spending several days without food, except eating lynne buds and slippery elm bark. They camped upon a small stream, and the company, numbering eight, held a council, and appointed , president, that they might receive the word of the Lord in relation to the situation of Joseph the Prophet and those that were with him, also in relation to their families, and what they were to do to obtain food: they all knelt down in a circle and each one prayed, then the spirit of the Lord came upon , and being filled with the Holy Ghost, he arose and said:—
“’Thus saith the Lord, my servant Joseph is not injured, nor any of his brethren that are with him, but they will all be delivered out of the hands of their enemies; your families are all well, but anxious about you. Let your hearts be comforted, for I the Lord will provide food for you on the morrow.’ They went to bed with glad hearts, and arose in the morning and prayed again, and went out two by two to hunt for food. Bro. Clapp saw several squirrels and shot at them, but could not hit them; they were only to stay one hour: at the end of the time they all returned except and . Feeling very faint, one of the brethren proposed killing a horse. Bro Clapp said that when Brothers and returned they would have food, as he never knew the Lord to give a false revelation to his servants, and while conversing upon the matter, the brethren made their appearance with two silk handkerchiefs tied up full of bread and dried meat. ’s mind was led in a certain direction, and following it, they came to an Indian camp; they made known to the Indians by signs, that they were hungry, upon this the squaw with all <​possible​> speed baked them some cakes and gave each of them two, sending two to each of the six brethren in camp, giving them to understand that she would be glad to send more but she had but little flour, and her Papooses (children) would be hungry. When they arrived in camp all felt to rejoice, they formed a circle around the food, and asked a blessing upon it: the bread was very good, being shortened with Raccoon’s oil. After eating they started upon their journey and obtained food sufficient so that none perished.
arrived in , and was there to assist his and [HC 7:220] over the on their arrival, and hired a house for them, into which he also assisted four other families of the Saints, and, according to the word of the Lord unto him, his brothers, Joseph and were delivered, and they arrived in in April 1839.
“He moved up to with his brethren, and from thence, in company with , he moved on to a farm <​which he rented​> near , McDonough Co., where he spent the season farming. Elders and called upon them as they went on their missions to and held a meeting with the Saints in that place (Oct. 11. 1839). preached, and was followed by ; who enjoyed much of the Holy Spirit [p. 291]
August 1 damned Mormons for they were stopped by a damned snow storm.
“After they had got some distance on their journey the company divided into three parts, the three brethren named fell in company with ; their provisions gave out, and after spending several days without food, except eating lynne buds and slippery elm bark. They camped upon a small stream, and the company, numbering eight, held a council, and appointed , president, that they might receive the word of the Lord in relation to the situation of Joseph the Prophet and those that were with him, also in relation to their families, and what they were to do to obtain food: they all knelt down in a circle and each one prayed, then the spirit of the Lord came upon , and being filled with the Holy Ghost, he arose and said:—
“’Thus saith the Lord, my servant Joseph is not injured, nor any of his brethren that are with him, but they will all be delivered out of the hands of their enemies; your families are all well, but anxious about you. Let your hearts be comforted, for I the Lord will provide food for you on the morrow.’ They went to bed with glad hearts, and arose in the morning and prayed again, and went out two by two to hunt for food. Bro. Clapp saw several squirrels and shot at them, but could not hit them; they were only to stay one hour: at the end of the time they all returned except and . Feeling very faint, one of the brethren proposed killing a horse. Bro Clapp said that when Brothers and returned they would have food, as he never knew the Lord to give a false revelation to his servants, and while conversing upon the matter, the brethren made their appearance with two silk handkerchiefs tied up full of bread and dried meat. ’s mind was led in a certain direction, and following it, they came to an Indian camp; they made known to the Indians by signs, that they were hungry, upon this the squaw with all possible speed baked them some cakes and gave each of them two, sending two to each of the six brethren in camp, giving them to understand that she would be glad to send more but she had but little flour, and her Papooses (children) would be hungry. When they arrived in camp all felt to rejoice, they formed a circle around the food, and asked a blessing upon it: the bread was very good, being shortened with Raccoon’s oil. After eating they started upon their journey and obtained food sufficient so that none perished.
arrived in , and was there to assist his and [HC 7:220] over the on their arrival, and hired a house for them, into which he also assisted four other families of the Saints, and, according to the word of the Lord unto him, his brothers, Joseph and were delivered, and they arrived in in April 1839.
“He moved in company with , on to a farm which he rented near , McDonough Co., where he spent the season farming. Elders and called upon them as they went on their missions to and held a meeting with the Saints in that place (Oct. 11. 1839). preached, and was followed by ; who enjoyed much of the Holy Spirit [p. 291]
Page 291