History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 44
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<​May 17​> they represent, and also to send delegates to the Baltimore Convention.
Resolved, that and , Esqre., be requested to furnish a copy of their speeches for publication. [HC 6:391]
Resolved, that the electors be instructed to make stump speeches in their different districts.
Resolved, that the thanks of this meeting be given to for his patriotic song.
“It was moved and seconded that , , , , and , represent this Convention at the Convention to be held in Baltimore on the 13th of July next.
, Esqre., then addressed the meeting, and was succeeded by the following gentlemen:— Gen. Joseph Smith, Dr. , , , , , and , Esqre..
“It was moved, seconded, and carried, that the thanks of this meeting be given to the and Secretary.
“The Convention was addressed in an eloquent speech by , Esq., showing the political dishonesty of both and , and stating his views, and the present condition of the country.
rose and addressed the Convention in the following eloquent strain:
and Fellow Citizens,—
‘As an American— a citizen of St. Clair County, and of the State of , with the deference ever acknowledged on occasions like this, I feel the spirit of obedience that was required of one of old when he was bade to take off his shoes for he was walking on holy ground, and that this was a holy cause.
‘Influenced by the distinguished honors paid me on the 24th. of April in the convention then here held, and the invitation to associate on this occasion, I feel that on occasions of this importance it commands the rallying excuses of more than a Bonapartean or Mortier desperation; that to have names now brought before an American people that have for the last fourteen years or longer, been like the foot ball of the sportsman and the extraordinary selected subjects of derision and contumely, that new expressions are about to be made that the people are about to trace back the erroneous doings of a nation, to weep and repent for malefactors, to examine the old building that in those days was founded by our forefathers, and for want of qualified tenants, has become occasionally tinged with filth and spurious matter— that its anticipated solidity to the beating storms has ceded— and its firmness in various ranges assumed dubitable type. The Jeffersonian doctrines have been forsaken; merit and qualification have been abandoned, humbuggery and sarcasm in their stead adopted, and modern American growth in the unhealthy tones of vice, farce, non-sustenance of truth, and non-valorous deeds in their stead, the only objects for promotion captioned by these expressions, to this august assembly. In the character of a delegate from St.Clair county, I say, that reform— politically as well as morally, claims the present field; that the many gubernative exercises of the various Presidents since those days that were honored by a [George] Washington, a [Thomas] Jefferson, [James] Madison, [James] Monroe, and [Andrew] Jackson, have been to Americans, thorns whose irritability never cease, whose national maligne depot has been indelible and that has cankered the lovely cement that germinated in the days of the Revolution in 1776, and that were by our forefathers fostered with hope of ameliorizing the conditions of this and previous generations. Unwilling as I may be to offer [p. 44]
May 17 they represent, and also to send delegates to the Baltimore Convention.
Resolved, that and , Esqre., be requested to furnish a copy of their speeches for publication. [HC 6:391]
Resolved, that the electors be instructed to make stump speeches in their different districts.
Resolved, that the thanks of this meeting be given to for his patriotic song.
“It was moved and seconded that , , , , and , represent this Convention at the Convention to be held in Baltimore on the 13th of July next.
, Esqre., then addressed the meeting, and was succeeded by the following gentlemen:— Gen. Joseph Smith, Dr. , , , , , and , Esqre..
“It was moved, seconded, and carried, that the thanks of this meeting be given to the and Secretary.
“The Convention was addressed in an eloquent speech by , Esq., showing the political dishonesty of both and , and stating his views, and the present condition of the country.
rose and addressed the Convention in the following eloquent strain:
and Fellow Citizens,—
‘As an American— a citizen of St. Clair County, and of the State of , with the deference ever acknowledged on occasions like this, I feel the spirit of obedience that was required of one of old when he was bade to take off his shoes for he was walking on holy ground, and that this was a holy cause.
‘Influenced by the distinguished honors paid me on the 24th. of April in the convention then here held, and the invitation to associate on this occasion, I feel that on occasions of this importance it commands the rallying excuses of more than a Bonapartean or Mortier desperation; that to have names now brought before an American people that have for the last fourteen years or longer, been like the foot ball of the sportsman and the extraordinary selected subjects of derision and contumely, that new expressions are about to be made that the people are about to trace back the erroneous doings of a nation, to weep and repent for malefactors, to examine the old building that in those days was founded by our forefathers, and for want of qualified tenants, has become occasionally tinged with filth and spurious matter— that its anticipated solidity to the beating storms has ceded— and its firmness in various ranges assumed dubitable type. The Jeffersonian doctrines have been forsaken; merit and qualification have been abandoned, humbuggery and sarcasm in their stead adopted, and modern American growth in the unhealthy tones of vice, farce, non-sustenance of truth, and non-valorous deeds in their stead, the only objects for promotion captioned by these expressions, to this august assembly. In the character of a delegate from St.Clair county, I say, that reform— politically as well as morally, claims the present field; that the many gubernative exercises of the various Presidents since those days that were honored by a George Washington, a Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, and [Andrew] Jackson, have been to Americans, thorns whose irritability never cease, whose national maligne depot has been indelible and that has cankered the lovely cement that germinated in the days of the Revolution in 1776, and that were by our forefathers fostered with hope of ameliorizing the conditions of this and previous generations. Unwilling as I may be to offer [p. 44]
Page 44