History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​June 10.​> dollars, which, on account of expenditure for the poor, he was not able to pay to within some 70 or 80 dollars, which they pressed him for as soon as they wanted it, although he offered them good property at considerable less than the market value; as was obliged to leave the city on church business for a little season. threatened and intimidated family during his absence for the pay.
made a public dinner on the 4th of July. was obliged to be absent, and deposited meat, flour &c., with to give to the poor at that dinner, and handed it out as his own private property. carried a load of wheat to ’s mill to be ground; would not grind it only to give a certain quantity of flour in return by weight. used up the flour, promising from time to time he would refund it. As was about to start on a mission to the south, with his valise in hand, saw before his door, talking with , called on and told him he was going away, and his family wanted the flour; promised on the honor of a gentleman and a saint that his family should have the flour when they wanted.
“Councilor said he recollected the time and circumstance.
said, when he returned he found his family must have starved if they had not borrowed money to get food somewhere else; could not get it of . And was preaching puntuality, punctuality, punctuality, as the whole drift of his discourses to the saints; and abusing them himself all the time, and grinding the poor.
“Mayor said if he had a council who felt as he did, the establishment (referring to the Nauvoo Expositor) would be <​declared​> a nuisance before night; and he then read an editorial from the Nauvoo Expositor. He then asked who ever said a word against until he has attacked this council; or even against or the Laws, until they came out against the ? Here is a paper (Nauvoo Expositor) that is exciting our enemies abroad. has been proved a murderer before this council, and he declared the paper a nuisance, a greater nuisance then a dead carcase. They make <​it​> a criminality for a man to have a wife on the earth while he has one in heaven, according to the Keys of the holy priesthood; and he then read a statement of ’s from the Expositor, where the truth of God was transformed into a lie concerning this thing. He then read several statements of in the Expositor concerning a private interview, and said he never had any private conversation with on these subjects; that he preached on the stand from the bible, shewing the order in ancient days, having nothing to do with the present times. What the opposition party [HC 6:441] want, is to raise a mob on us and take the spoil from us, as they did in ; he said it was as much as he could do to keep his clerk , from publishing the proceedings of the Laws, and causing the people to rise up against them; said he would rather die tomorrow, and have the thing smashed, than live and have it go on, for it was exciting the spirit of mobocracy among the people, and bringing death and destruction upon us.
recalled a circumstance which he had forgot to mention, concerning a Mr. Smith who came from and soon after died; the children had no one to protect them. There was one girl 16 or 17 years old, and a younger sister; took these girls into his family out of pity. , then Major General of the Nauvoo Legion, was familiar with the eldest daughter; ed cautioned the girl. was soon there again and went out in the evening with the girl, who when charged by the ’s wife confessed that had seduced her. told her he could not keep her; the girl wept, made much ado, and many promises; told her if she would do right, she might stay; but she did not keep her promise. came again, and she went out with him; then [p. 80]
June 10. dollars, which, on account of expenditure for the poor, he was not able to pay to within some 70 or 80 dollars, which they pressed him for as soon as they wanted it, although he offered them good property at considerable less than the market value; as was obliged to leave the city on church business for a little season. threatened and intimidated ’ family during his absence for the pay.
made a public dinner on the 4th of July. was obliged to be absent, and deposited meat, flour &c., with to give to the poor at that dinner, and handed it out as his own private property. carried a load of wheat to ’s mill to be ground; would not grind it only to give a certain quantity of flour in return by weight. used up the flour, promising from time to time he would refund it. As was about to start on a mission to the south, with his valise in hand, saw before his door, talking with , called on and told him he was going away, and his family wanted the flour; promised on the honor of a gentleman and a saint that his family should have the flour when they wanted.
“Councilor said he recollected the time and circumstance.
said, when he returned he found his family must have starved if they had not borrowed money to get food somewhere else; could not get it of . And was preaching puntuality, punctuality, punctuality, as the whole drift of his discourses to the saints; and abusing them himself all the time, and grinding the poor.
“Mayor said if he had a council who felt as he did, the establishment (referring to the Nauvoo Expositor) would be declared a nuisance before night; and he then read an editorial from the Nauvoo Expositor. He then asked who ever said a word against until he attacked this council; or even against or the Laws, until they came out against the ? Here is a paper (Nauvoo Expositor) that is exciting our enemies abroad. has been proved a murderer before this council, and he declared the paper a nuisance, a greater nuisance then a dead carcase. They make it a criminality for a man to have a wife on the earth while he has one in heaven, according to the Keys of the holy priesthood; and he then read a statement of ’s from the Expositor, where the truth of God was transformed into a lie concerning this thing. He then read several statements of in the Expositor concerning a private interview, and said he never had any private conversation with on these subjects; that he preached on the stand from the bible, shewing the order in ancient days, having nothing to do with the present times. What the opposition party [HC 6:441] want, is to raise a mob on us and take the spoil from us, as they did in ; he said it was as much as he could do to keep his clerk , from publishing the proceedings of the Laws, and causing the people to rise up against them; said he would rather die tomorrow, and have the thing smashed, than live and have it go on, for it was exciting the spirit of mobocracy among the people, and bringing death and destruction upon us.
recalled a circumstance which he had forgot to mention, concerning a Mr. Smith who came from and soon after died; the children had no one to protect them. There was one girl 16 or 17 years old, and a younger sister; took these girls into his family out of pity. , then Major General of the Nauvoo Legion, was familiar with the eldest daughter; cautioned the girl. was soon there again and went out in the evening with the girl, who when charged by the ’s wife confessed that had seduced her. told her he could not keep her; the girl wept, made much ado, and many promises; told her if she would do right, she might stay; but she did not keep her promise. came again, and she went out with him; then [p. 80]
Page 80