Hyrum Smith, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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out of the surrounding counties about a hundred more, which made <​his force​> about 150 strong, was stationed at Crooked Creek, sending out his scouting parties taking men women & children prisoners driving off cattle hogs & horses, entering into every house in the on Log & Long Creek; rifling their houses off their most precious articles, such as money, bedding & clothing, taking all their old muskets and their rifles or military implements threatening the people with instant death if they did not deliver up all their precious things; and entered into a covenant to leave the the state or go into the city of by the next morning, saying that “they calculated to drive the people into and then drive them to hell”— also was doing the same on the north west side of — and , was the a Presbyterian minister, was the leader of the mob in , & a very noted man of the same society was the leader of the mob in Carroll County, & they were also sending out their scouting parties; robbing & pillaging houses driving away hogs horses & cattle, taking men women & children & carrying them off; threatening their lives <​&​> subjecting them to all manner of abuses that they could invent or think of. Under this state of alarm & excitement and distress the messengers returned from the & from the other authorities bringing the fatal news, that the mormons could have no assistance; they stated that the said that “the mormons had got into a difficulty with the citizens, and they might fight it out for all what he cared.” He could not render them any assistance.”— The people of were obliged to leave their homes and go into ; but did not until after many of them <​had​> starved to death, for want of proper sustenance & several died on the road there, and were buried by the way side without a coffin or a funeral ceremony & the distress <​sufferings & privations​> of the people cannot be expressed. All the scattered families of the mormon people, in all the Counties except , were driven into with but few exceptions. This only increased their distress, for many thousands <​who​> were driven there, had no habitations or houses to shelter them and [p. 5]
out of the surrounding counties about a hundred more, which made his force about 150 strong, was stationed at Crooked Creek, sending out his scouting parties taking men women & children prisoners driving off cattle hogs & horses, entering into every house on Log & Long Creek; rifling their houses of their most precious articles, such as money, bedding & clothing, taking all their old muskets and their rifles or military implements threatening the people with instant death if they did not deliver up all their precious things; and enter into a covenant to leave the state or go into the city of by the next morning, saying that “they calculated to drive the people into and then drive them to hell”— also was doing the same on the north west side of — and , a Presbyterian minister, was the leader of the mob in , & a very noted man of the same society was the leader of the mob in Carroll County, & they were also sending out their scouting parties; robbing & pillaging houses driving away hogs horses & cattle, taking men women & children & carrying them off; threatening their lives & subjecting them to all manner of abuses that they could invent or think of. Under this state of alarm & excitement and distress the messengers returned from the & from the other authorities bringing the fatal news, that the mormons could have no assistance; they stated that the said that “the mormons had got into a difficulty with the citizens, and they might fight it out for all what he cared.” He could not render them any assistance.”— The people of were obliged to leave their homes and go into ; but did not until after many of them had starved to death, for want of proper sustenance & several died on the road there, and were buried by the way side without a coffin or a funeral ceremony & the distress sufferings & privations of the people cannot be expressed. All the scattered families of the mormon people, in all the Counties except , were driven into with but few exceptions. This only increased their distress, for many thousands who were driven there, had no habitations or houses to shelter them and [p. 5]
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