No image available

Introduction to Holmes v. Dayton et al.

Holmes v. Dayton, Slitor, and JS
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 5 June 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 15 November 1836, JS, , and Truman Slitor signed a promissory note for $208.30, which they gave to Ezra Holmes. The reason they took on the debt is unknown, but each of these men was involved in land transactions in the , Ohio, area in fall 1836. Dayton was a church member at the time, and Slitor may have been as well; he was baptized before September 1837, when he was ordained an elder. The two men were related by marriage; Slitor’s older brother Richard was married to Dayton’s sister Amanda.
JS, , and Slitor failed to repay the note on 1 January 1837, when it was due, and Holmes brought this assumpsit action. Though JS and Slitor were personally served with notice of the action against them, the defendants failed to appear for the trial during the court’s June term.
The reason JS did not appear may have been his involvement in other legal actions, one a criminal action based on ’s accusation that JS had tried to kill him, and another a civil action brought by Timothy Martindale, concerning a $5,000 note. Though JS, Slitor, and failed to appear in court, they did satisfy the judgment against them on 15 July 1837.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
Holmes v. Dayton, Slitor, and JS
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 5 June 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 15 November 1836, JS, , and Truman Slitor signed a promissory note for $208.30, which they gave to Ezra Holmes. The reason they took on the debt is unknown, but each of these men was involved in land transactions in the , Ohio, area in fall 1836. Dayton was a church member at the time, and Slitor may have been as well; he was baptized before September 1837, when he was ordained an elder. The two men were related by marriage; Slitor’s older brother Richard was married to Dayton’s sister Amanda.
JS, , and Slitor failed to repay the note on 1 January 1837, when it was due, and Holmes brought this assumpsit action. Though JS and Slitor were personally served with notice of the action against them, the defendants failed to appear for the trial during the court’s June term.
The reason JS did not appear may have been his involvement in other legal actions, one a criminal action based on ’s accusation that JS had tried to kill him, and another a civil action brought by Timothy Martindale, concerning a $5,000 note. Though JS, Slitor, and failed to appear in court, they did satisfy the judgment against them on 15 July 1837.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
 
 
Holmes v. Dayton et al., Court of Common Pleas