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Introduction to Seymour & Griffith v. Rigdon and JS

Seymour & Griffith v. Rigdon and JS
Geauga County, Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, circa 24 October 1837
 
Historical Introduction
In February and March 1837, and JS became indebted to John S. Seymour and Thomas Griffith, who operated a dry goods business in , Ohio, under the firm of Seymour & Griffith. Rigdon and JS signed four promissory notes to the firm totaling $147. When the notes went unpaid, Seymour & Griffith began proceedings to recover payment on 27 July 1837. The court of common pleas in , Ohio, issued a writ of capias ad respondendum, authorizing the apprehension of Rigdon and JS. The two church leaders left , Ohio, in company of on the same day, 27 July, intending to travel to and visit members of the church there. However, when they arrived in Painesville, sheriff Abel Kimball took JS and Rigdon into custody because of the debt to Seymour & Griffith; JS’s arrest was connected, in addition, to another complaint begun 26 July by Kirtland resident William Barker for an unpaid debt. JS’s history noted that he and his companions were detained in Painesville “all day by malicious and vexatious Law suits.” At some point before the October court term, the debt with Seymour & Griffith was apparently satisfied outside of the court, the plaintiffs discontinued their suit, and Rigdon and JS were “discharged by order of the plaintiffs.” The court ordered the plaintiffs to pay the costs of the suit.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
Seymour & Griffith v. Rigdon and JS
Geauga County, Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, circa 24 October 1837
 
Historical Introduction
In February and March 1837, and JS became indebted to John S. Seymour and Thomas Griffith, who operated a dry goods business in , Ohio, under the firm of Seymour & Griffith. Rigdon and JS signed four promissory notes to the firm totaling $147. When the notes went unpaid, Seymour & Griffith began proceedings to recover payment on 27 July 1837. The court of common pleas in , Ohio, issued a writ of capias ad respondendum, authorizing the apprehension of Rigdon and JS. The two church leaders left , Ohio, in company of on the same day, 27 July, intending to travel to and visit members of the church there. However, when they arrived in Painesville, sheriff Abel Kimball took JS and Rigdon into custody because of the debt to Seymour & Griffith; JS’s arrest was connected, in addition, to another complaint begun 26 July by Kirtland resident William Barker for an unpaid debt. JS’s history noted that he and his companions were detained in Painesville “all day by malicious and vexatious Law suits.” At some point before the October court term, the debt with Seymour & Griffith was apparently satisfied outside of the court, the plaintiffs discontinued their suit, and Rigdon and JS were “discharged by order of the plaintiffs.” The court ordered the plaintiffs to pay the costs of the suit.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
 
 
Seymour & Griffith v. Rigdon and JS, Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas