John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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tains many promises of great things that should take place in the last days, for which purpose it has come forth, such as the preaching of the Gospel in its purity, setting up the true church of Christ, and establishing the regular orders of priesthoods in it as the ancients had them, and to bring about the great work of gathering the saints and the house of Israel—making preparations for and ushering in the great Millennial, building up the New Jerusalem, &c., as spoken by the prophets.
As to the seed of Joseph, I found in the Scripture a curious blessing pronounced upon them by Jacob his father. It reads thus: “Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well, whose branches run over the wall—The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessing of my progenitors, unto the utmost bounds of the everlasting hills, these shall be upon the head of Joseph,” &c.—(Gen. xlix. 22, 26.)
Now, we know, that Abraham and Isaac were Jacob’s progenitors and they had the land of Canaan promised to them and their seed for an everlasting possession; but Joseph’s blessing prevailed above, or exceeded theirs; he was to have an inheritance, somewhere of course, that far exceeded the land of Canaan: it was to extend to the utmost bounds of the everlasting hills. Now, when and where did they ever receive it? According to the Book of Mormon they received it upon this continent. And if so, we discover the fulfilment of the promise made to Ephraim and Manassah, that they should become a multitude of nations in the midst of the earth.—Gen. [xl]viii. 11, 20.
Chapter 6
CHAPTER VI.
 
The Gospel—Promises of God—Belief in their Fulfilment—Want of Faith.
 
The doctrines of the Gospel.
On this subject the Mormons believe in the same God, and in the same Saviour, and the same Gospel that other professors do; and they believe as firmly in the Scripture of the Old and New Testaments as any other people. They look upon their new revelations only as bringing about the fulfilment of the Bible. The main difference between them and other professors on the Gospel is, that they believe rather more firmly in the promises of God, especially those that require great faith for their fulfilment, than others do. Where the Scriptures hold out fair promises to the believers, they believe those promises will be fulfilled, just in proportion to their faith. Hence, when the Saviour commanded the Apostles to go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature, and gave them a promise that these signs shall follow them that believed; in his name they shall cast out devils, heal the sick, &c.,—-[Mark xvi. 15, 18]- they believe to be good to all that believe, whether in this age or any other. There are many promises of this kind, which, perhaps, are not noticed so particularly by others as the Mormons. I will name two or three. The Saviour says, “Verily, verily I say unto you, he that believeth on me [p. 14]
tains many promises of great things that should take place in the last days, for which purpose it has come forth, such as the preaching of the Gospel in its purity, setting up the true church of Christ, and establishing the regular orders of priesthoods in it as the ancients had them, and to bring about the great work of gathering the saints and the house of Israel—making preparations for and ushering in the great Millennial, building up the New Jerusalem, &c., as spoken by the prophets.
As to the seed of Joseph, I found in the Scripture a curious blessing pronounced upon them by Jacob his father. It reads thus: “Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well, whose branches run over the wall—The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessing of my progenitors, unto the utmost bounds of the everlasting hills, these shall be upon the head of Joseph,” &c.—(Gen. xlix. 22, 26.)
Now, we know, that Abraham and Isaac were Jacob’s progenitors and they had the land of Canaan promised to them and their seed for an everlasting possession; but Joseph’s blessing prevailed above, or exceeded theirs; he was to have an inheritance, somewhere of course, that far exceeded the land of Canaan: it was to extend to the utmost bounds of the everlasting hills. Now, when and where did they ever receive it? According to the Book of Mormon they received it upon this continent. And if so, we discover the fulfilment of the promise made to Ephraim and Manassah, that they should become a multitude of nations in the midst of the earth.—Gen. xlviii. 11, 20.
Chapter 6
CHAPTER VI.
 
The Gospel—Promises of God—Belief in their Fulfilment—Want of Faith.
 
The doctrines of the Gospel.
On this subject the Mormons believe in the same God, and in the same Saviour, and the same Gospel that other professors do; and they believe as firmly in the Scripture of the Old and New Testaments as any other people. They look upon their new revelations only as bringing about the fulfilment of the Bible. The main difference between them and other professors on the Gospel is, that they believe rather more firmly in the promises of God, especially those that require great faith for their fulfilment, than others do. Where the Scriptures hold out fair promises to the believers, they believe those promises will be fulfilled, just in proportion to their faith. Hence, when the Saviour commanded the Apostles to go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature, and gave them a promise that these signs shall follow them that believed; in his name they shall cast out devils, heal the sick, &c.,—-[Mark xvi. 15, 18]- they believe to be good to all that believe, whether in this age or any other. There are many promises of this kind, which, perhaps, are not noticed so particularly by others as the Mormons. I will name two or three. The Saviour says, “Verily, verily I say unto you, he that believeth on me [p. 14]
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