John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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partly armed, and marched to , but on learning that the Mormons had agreed to leave the , they conceded to the same and gave up their arms,— fifty two guns, a pistol and sword, which and others faithfully agreed to deliver up after the as soon as they had left the : but this they <​afterwards​> refused to do, although required to by a written order from the , and the Mormons have never received the guns nor an equivalent for them to this day. The Mormons all left in the course of three or four weeks. Some went to Vanburen county, some went <​to the​> eastward, but the major part went to , where they were received in a hospitable manner. and They were not suffered to return to , even to settle up their af business. During all these difficulties, the Mormons were accused of many crimes. This of course was necessary for an excuse. But the people of well know, that up to that time, the Mormons had not been guilty of crime nor done any thing whereby they could criminate them by the law; and, in my opinion, the<​se​> <​stories​> only reasons of their raising up <​originated in​> was their hatred towards the Mormon religion, and <​the fear intertained​> their fear of their overrunning and ruling the . The people of gave the Mormons employment and paid them good wages; and by their industry they made themselves comfortable with the exception of some [p. 31]
partly armed, and marched to , but on learning that the Mormons had agreed to leave the , they conceded to the same and gave up their arms,— fifty two guns, a pistol and sword, which and others faithfully agreed to deliver up as soon as they had left the : but this they afterwards refused to do, although required to by a written order from the , and the Mormons have never received the guns nor an equivalent for them to this day. The Mormons all left in the course of three or four weeks. Some went to Vanburen county, some to the eastward, but the major part went to , where they were received in a hospitable manner. They were not suffered to return to , even to settle up their business. During all these difficulties, the Mormons were accused of many crimes. This of course was necessary for an excuse. But the people of well know, that up to that time, the Mormons had not been guilty of crime nor done any thing whereby they could criminate them by the law; and, in my opinion, these stories originated in hatred towards the Mormon religion, and the fear intertained of their overrunning and ruling the . The people of gave the Mormons employment and paid them good wages; and by their industry they made themselves comfortable with the exception of some [p. 31]
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