John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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or murder, and among whom it would not be safe to go without a superior force of armed men. A writ of was called for, and issued, by the Municipal Court of taking us out of the hands of and placing us in the charge of the . We went before the Municipal Court and were dismissed. Our refusal to obey this illegal proceeding was, by them, <​construed​> into a refusal to submit to the Law, and circulated as such, and the people either did believe or professed to believe that we were in open rebellion, against the laws and authorities of the . Hence mobs began to assemble, among which <​& all through the country​> inflamitory speeches were made, exciting them to Mobocracy and violence. Soon they commenced their persecutions of our outside settlements kidnapping some and whipping and otherwise abusing others. The persons thus abused fled to , as soon as practicable, and related their injuries to Joseph Smith, then Mayor of the and Lieutenant General of the ; they also went before magistrates and made affidavits of <​what​> they had suffered, seen and heard. These affidavits, in connexion with a copy of all, our proceedings were forwarded by Joseph Smith to , then Governor of , with an expression of our desire to abide law, and a request that the Governor would instruct him how to proceed in case of the arrival of an armed mob against the . The sent <​back​> instructions to: Joseph Smith, that as he was Lieutenant Genl. of the Nauvoo Legion, it was his duty to protect the and surrounding country, and issued orders to that effect. Upon the reception of these orders, Joseph Smith [p. 13]
or murder, and among whom it would not be safe to go without a superior force of armed men. A writ of was called for, and issued, by the Municipal Court of taking us out of the hands of and placing us in the charge of the . We went before the Municipal Court and were dismissed. Our refusal to obey this illegal proceeding was, by them, construed into a refusal to submit to Law, and circulated as such, and the people either did believe or professed to believe that we were in open rebellion, against the laws and authorities of the . Hence mobs began to assemble, among which & all through the country inflamitory speeches were made, exciting them to Mobocracy and violence. Soon they commenced their persecutions of our outside settlements kidnapping some and whipping and otherwise abusing others. The persons thus abused fled to , as soon as practicable, and related their injuries to Joseph Smith, then Mayor of the and Lieutenant General of the ; they also went before magistrates and made affidavits of what they had suffered, seen and heard. These affidavits, in connexion with a copy of all, our proceedings were forwarded by Joseph Smith to , then Governor of , with an expression of our desire to abide law, and a request that the Governor would instruct him how to proceed in case of the arrival of an armed mob against the . The sent back instructions to: Joseph Smith, that as he was Lieutenant Genl. of the Nauvoo Legion, it was his duty to protect the and surrounding country, and issued orders to that effect. Upon the reception of these orders, Joseph Smith [p. 13]
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