John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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assembled the people of the , and laid before them the s instructions (Let search for these papers .) he also convened the officers of the for the purpose of conferring in relation to the <​See s notes​> best mode of defence. He also issued orders to the men to hold themselves in readiness in case of being called upon. On the following day (see record) Genl. Joseph Smith, with his staff, the leading officers of the Legion and some prominent strangers, who were in our midst, made a survey of the outside boundaries of the , which was very extensive, being about five miles up and down the , and about two and a half back in the Centre, for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the ground and the feasibility of defence, and to make all necessary arrangements in case of an attack.
It may be well here to remark, that numbers of gentlemen who were to us strangers, either came on purpose or were passing through , who, upon learning the position of things, expressed their indignation against our enemies, and who avowed their readiness to assist us, by their counsel or otherwise; it was some of these who assisted us in reconnoitering the , and finding out its adaptability for a defense and the best mode of protection against an armed force. The was called together, and drilled; and every means made use of for defence; at the call of the officers both old and yound [young] came forward both denizens of the , and from the outside regions, and I believe at one time [p. 14]
assembled the people of the , and laid before them the s instructions (Let search for these papers .) he also convened the officers of the for the purpose of conferring in relation to the See s notes best mode of defence. He also issued orders to the men to hold themselves in readiness in case of being called upon. On the following day (see record) Genl. Joseph Smith, with his staff, the leading officers of the Legion and some prominent strangers, who were in our midst, made a survey of the outside boundaries of the , which was very extensive, being about five miles up and down the , and about two and a half back in the Centre, for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the ground and the feasibility of defence, and to make all necessary arrangements in case of an attack.
It may be well here to remark, that numbers of gentlemen who were to us strangers, either came on purpose or were passing through , who, upon learning the position of things, expressed their indignation against our enemies, and avowed their readiness to assist us, by their counsel or otherwise; it was some of these who assisted us in reconnoitering the , and finding out its adaptability for a defense and the best mode of protection against an armed force. The was called together, and drilled; and every means made use of for defence; at the call of the officers both old and yound young came forward both denizens of the , and from the outside regions, and I believe at one time [p. 14]
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