John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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town, I remembered some woods that we had to go through; and telling a person near to call for Dr. Ells, who was riding a very good horse, I said; “Dr. I perceive that the people are getting fatigued with carrying me; there lives, about two or three miles from here, on <​near​> our route, a number of Mormons, will you ride to their settlement as quick as possible, and have them come and meet us.” He started off on a gallop immediately. My object in this was to obtain protection in case of an attack rather than <​to obtain​> help to carry me. Very soon after, the men from made one excuse after another untill they had all left, and I felt glad to get rid of them. I found that the tramping of those carrying me produced violent pain, and a sleigh was produced and attatched to the hind end of Br. s’ Waggon, a bed placed upon it, and I propped up on the bed. Mrs. Taylor rode with me applying ice, and ice water to my wounds. As the sleigh was dragged over the grass, on the prairie, which was quite tall, it moved very easily, and gave me very little pain.
When I got within five or six miles of the the brethren commenced to meet me from the , and they increased in numbers as we grew nearer untill there was a very large company of people of all ages and of both sexes, principally, however, men.
For some time there had been almost incessant rain, so that in many <​low​> places in the [p. 66]
town, I remembered some woods that we had to go through; and telling a person near to call for Dr. Ells, who was riding a very good horse, I said; “Dr. I perceive that the people are getting fatigued with carrying me; there lives, about two or three miles from here, near our route, a number of Mormons, will you ride to their settlement as quick as possible, and have them come and meet us.” He started off on a gallop immediately. My object in this was to obtain protection in case of an attack rather than to obtain help to carry me. Very soon after, the men from made one excuse after another untill they had all left, and I felt glad to get rid of them. I found that the tramping of those carrying me produced violent pain, and a sleigh was produced and attatched to the hind end of Br. s’ Waggon, a bed placed upon it, and I propped up on the bed. Mrs. Taylor rode with me applying ice, and ice water to my wounds. As the sleigh was dragged over the grass, on the prairie, which was quite tall, it moved very easily, and gave me very little pain.
When I got within five or six miles of the brethren commenced to meet me from the , and they increased in numbers as we grew nearer untill there was a very large company of people of all ages and of both sexes, principally, however, men.
For some time there had been almost incessant rain, so that in many low places in the [p. 66]
Page 66