John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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the publication of a libelous paper, in , called the “Nauvoo Expositor”. This paper not only reprinted from the others, but put into circulation the most libellous, false and infamous reports concerning the citizens of , and especially the ladies. I<​t​> was however no sooner put into circulation <​however​> than the indignation of the whole community was aroused; so much so that they threatened its anihilation, and I do not believe that in any other city in the , if the same charges had been made against the Citizens, it would have been permitted to remain one day. As it was among us, under these circumstances, it was thought best to convene the City Council, to take into consideration the adoption of some measures for its removal, as it was deemed better that this should be done legally, than illegally. Joseph Smith therefore, who was then Mayor, convened the City Council for that purpose, the paper was introduced and read, and the subject examined. All, or nearly all present, expressed their indignation at the course taken by The Expositor which was owned by some of the aforesaid apostates, associated with one or two others; , , , (see record and insert other proprietors names) owned it, and the Higbees before referred to; some Lawyers, Storekeepers and others in , who were not mormons; together with the Anti-Mormons, outside of the , sustained it. The calculation was by false statements to unsettle the minds [p. 7]
the publication of a libelous paper, in , called the “Nauvoo Expositor”. This paper not only reprinted from the others, but put into circulation the most libellous, false and infamous reports concerning the citizens of , and especially the ladies. It was however no sooner put into circulation than the indignation of the whole community was aroused; so much so that they threatened its anihilation, and I do not believe that in any other city in the , if the same charges had been made against the Citizens, it would have been permitted to remain one day. As it was among us, under these circumstances, it was thought best to convene the City Council, to take into consideration the adoption of some measures for its removal, as it was deemed better that this should be done legally, than illegally. Joseph Smith therefore, who was then Mayor, convened the City Council for that purpose, the paper was introduced and read, and the subject examined. All, or nearly all present, expressed their indignation at the course taken by The Expositor which was owned by some of the aforesaid apostates, associated with one or two others; , , , (see record and insert other proprietors names) owned it, and the Higbees before referred to; some Lawyers, Storekeepers and others in , who were not mormons; together with the Anti-Mormons, outside of the , sustained it. The calculation was by false statements to unsettle the minds [p. 7]
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