Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 169
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be assured that this matter Gives me no uneasiness nor would the subject now have been mentioned had you not requested a reply to your enquiries. I have seen your denial of the prediction published in the Wasp attributed to you of the death (or assassination) of , be that true or false, nothing has contributed more towards fixing the belief upon the public mind, that you had made such prediction than the repeated statements of a portion of your followers, that the maner of his death had been revealed to you, and their exultation that it must needs be fulfilled
In reference to your request to be advised how you should act in case a mob should come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any course for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first Law of Nature, viz to defend your own rights, because ware I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on whilst those rights ware violated and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them,
I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at presant, any real caus for the aprehension of a Mob coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it,
very respectfully your obedient servant
General Joseph Smith
s letter
July 27th 1842
Dear Sir
your communication of the 25th instant together [with] the petitions of the citizens of the city of both male and female ware delivered to me last evening by Brevet Major General Allso a report of Esq Sectry of the Legion of the procedings of a court Martial of Brevet Major Generals had upon charges prefered against Major General upon which trial the court found defendant guilty and sentenced him to be Cashiered
all of which have been considered, In reply to your expressed aprehentions of— the posibility of an attack upon the peaceable inhabitants of the city of and vicinity; through the intreaguees and false representations of and others, and you[r] request that I would inssue [issue] official orders to you, to have the Legion <​in​> readiness to be caled out at a moments warning in defence of the peaceble citizens &c I must say that I cannot concieve of the least probability or scarcely posability of an attack of violence upon the citizens of from any quarter what ever and as uterly imposible that such attack is contemplated by any sufficient number of persons [p. 169]
be assured that this matter Gives me no uneasiness nor would the subject now have been mentioned had you not requested a reply to your enquiries. I have seen your denial of the prediction published in the Wasp attributed to you of the death (or assassination) of , be that true or false, nothing has contributed more towards fixing the belief upon the public mind, that you had made such prediction than the repeated statements of a portion of your followers, that the maner of his death had been revealed to you, and their exultation that it must needs be fulfilled
In reference to your request to be advised how you should act in case a mob should come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any course for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first Law of Nature, viz to defend your own rights, because ware I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on whilst those rights ware violated and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them,
I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at presant, any real caus for the aprehension of a Mob coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it,
very respectfully your obedient servant
General Joseph Smith
s letter
July 27th 1842
Dear Sir
your communication of the 25th instant together with the petitions of the citizens of the city of both male and female ware delivered to me last evening by Brevet Major General Allso a report of Esq Sectry of the Legion of the procedings of a court Martial of Brevet Major Generals had upon charges prefered against Major General upon which trial the court found defendant guilty and sentenced him to be Cashiered
all of which have been considered, In reply to your expressed aprehentions of— the posibility of an attack upon the peaceable inhabitants of the city of and vicinity; through the intreaguees and false representations of and others, and your request that I would inssue issue official orders to you, to have the Legion in readiness to be caled out at a moments warning in defence of the peaceble citizens &c I must say that I cannot concieve of the least probability or scarcely posability of an attack of violence upon the citizens of from any quarter what ever and as uterly imposible that such attack is contemplated by any sufficient number of persons [p. 169]
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