Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 185
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early in the morning; but did not say that he had seen him since. While this conversation was passing, president Joseph passed out at the back door and through the corn in his garden to brother ’s. He went up stairs and undiscovered. Meantime went and conversed with the Sheriffs. said he wanted to search the house for Mr Smith. In answer to a question by he said he had no Warrant authorising him to search but insisted upon searching the house. She did not refuse, and accordingly they searched through but to no effect. This is another testimony and evidence of the mean, corrupt, illegal proceedings of our enemies Notwithstanding the constitution of the says Article 4th. “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Yet these men audaciously, impudently, and altogether illegally demanded, and searched the house of president Joseph, even without any warrant or authority whatever. Being satisfied that he was not in the house they departed. They appeared to be well armed, and no doubt intended to take him either dead or alive; which we afterwards heard they had said they would do; but the Almighty again delivered his servant from their blood-thirsty grasp. It is rumored that there are fifteen men in the city along with the Sheriffs and that they dined together to day at ’s. Soon after Sun down and another person arived at the house and demanded to search, which they immediately did; but finding nothing they also went towards ’s. Some of them was seen about afterwards but at about 10 o clock all was quiet. It is said that they started from yesterday expecting and fully determined to reach in the night and fall upon the house unawares but report says they lost the road, and got scattered away one from another, and could not get along untill daylight. This in all probability is true as they appeared much fatigued and complained of being weary and sore with riding. President Joseph, accompanied by brother , left s about nine o clock; and went to brother s where he was welcomed and made comfortable by the family, and where he can be kept safe from the hands of his enemies.
I will now proceed to record the following letter from the to Sister Emma dated
August 24th. 1842
“Dear Madam— Your letter of this date has just been handed to me which recalls to my mind your great solicitude in reference to the security and welfare of your husband; but I need not say it recalls to my mind the subject matter of your solicitude, because that subject except at short intervals, has not been absent from my mind. I can scarcely furnish you a justifiable apology for delaying a reply so long, but be assured Madam, it is not for want of regard for you, and your peace of mind, that I have postponed; but a crowd of public business, which has required [p. 185]
early in the morning; but did not say that he had seen him since. While this conversation was passing, president Joseph passed out at the back door and through the corn in his garden to brother ’s. He went up stairs and undiscovered. Meantime went and conversed with the Sheriffs. said he wanted to search the house for Mr Smith. In answer to a question by he said he had no Warrant authorising him to search but insisted upon searching the house. She did not refuse, and accordingly they searched through but to no effect. This is another testimony and evidence of the mean, corrupt, illegal proceedings of our enemies Notwithstanding the constitution of the says Article 4th. “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Yet these men audaciously, impudently, and altogether illegally demanded, and searched the house of president Joseph, even without any warrant or authority whatever. Being satisfied that he was not in the house they departed. They appeared to be well armed, and no doubt intended to take him either dead or alive; which we afterwards heard they had said they would do; but the Almighty again delivered his servant from their blood-thirsty grasp. It is rumored that there are fifteen men in the city along with the Sheriffs and that they dined together to day at ’s. Soon after Sun down and another person arived at the house and demanded to search, which they immediately did; but finding nothing they also went towards ’s. Some of them was seen about afterwards but at about 10 o clock all was quiet. It is said that they started from yesterday expecting and fully determined to reach in the night and fall upon the house unawares but report says they lost the road, and got scattered away one from another, and could not get along untill daylight. This in all probability is true as they appeared much fatigued and complained of being weary and sore with riding. President Joseph, accompanied by brother , left s about nine o clock; and went to brother s where he was welcomed and made comfortable by the family, and where he can be kept safe from the hands of his enemies.
I will now proceed to record the following letter from the to Sister Emma dated
August 24th. 1842
“Dear Madam— Your letter of this date has just been handed to me which recalls to my mind your great solicitude in reference to the security and welfare of your husband; but I need not say it recalls to my mind the subject matter of your solicitude, because that subject except at short intervals, has not been absent from my mind. I can scarcely furnish you a justifiable apology for delaying a reply so long, but be assured Madam, it is not for want of regard for you, and your peace of mind, that I have postponed; but a crowd of public business, which has required [p. 185]
Page 185