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Letter from Mason Brayman, 29 July 1843

  • Source Note
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all likelihood do, without compulsion, if left to themselves? As well might I break the head of my best friend with a club, to make him more my friend! No Sir! there is neither truth, or good sense in this insidious charge. , is anxious for the time to arrive when this vexatious persecution against you shall cease— when your people, like all other citizens of whatever religious sect, will be left free to worship God in your own chosen way, and to vote as the predilections and opinions of each man shall dictate— each choosing for himself. He does not desire to control in the slightest degree to the action of a single individual; and he has that sense of your good manly independence and freedom of soul to know that such an attempt to do so, would meet with an indignant rebuke, and lose him your friendship forever. All his friends unite in this sentiment; and for myself, I should cease to respect an executive who could be influenced by such mercenary considerations.
Vote, preach, pray, and worship God as you please, and, so that you violate no law, you have nothing to fear from the or his advisers. His decision in your case, will be precisely the same whether he makes it before the election, or whether you vote for one or the other of the political parties. Do not therefore [p. 6]
all likelihood do, without compulsion, if left to themselves? As well might I break the head of my best friend with a club, to make him more my friend! No Sir! there is neither truth, or good sense in this insidious charge. , is anxious for the time to arrive when this vexatious persecution against you shall cease— when your people, like all other citizens of whatever religious sect, will be left free to worship God in your own chosen way, and to vote as the predilections and opinions of each man shall dictate— each choosing for himself. He does not desire to control in the slightest degree the action of a single individual; and he has that sense of your manly independence and freedom of soul to know that an attempt to do so, would meet with an indignant rebuke, and lose him your friendship forever. All his friends unite in this sentiment; and for myself, I should cease to respect an executive who could be influenced by such mercenary considerations.
Vote, preach, pray, and worship God as you please, and, so that you violate no law, you have nothing to fear from the or his advisers. His decision in your case, will be precisely the same whether he makes it before the election, or whether you vote for one or the other of the political parties. Do not therefore [p. 6]
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