Letter from Orson Hyde, 25 April 1844

  • Source Note
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I will now give you my opinion in relation to this matter. It is made up from the spirit of the times in a hasty manner; nevertheless I think time will prove it to be correct:
That Congress will pass no act in relation to or at present. She is afraid of , afraid of and afraid the presidential Election will be twisted by it. The members all appear like unskilful players at checkers chequers afraid to move, for they see not which way to move advantageously. All are figuring and playing round the grand and important questions. In the days of our Lord, the people neglected the weightier matters of the law, but tithed mint, rue, annis, and cummin, but I think here in they <​do​> little else than tithe the mint.
A member of Congress is in no enviable situation. If he will boldly advocate true principles, he loses his influence and becomes unpopular; and who<​ever​> is committed and <​has​> lost his his influence, has no power to benefit his constituents: so they all go to figuring and playing round the great points. said that Mr. Smith could not constitutionally be constituted a member of the Army by law; and this, if nothing else would prevent its passage. I observed that I would, in that case, strike out that clause. Prehaps I took an unwarrantable responsibility upon myself; but where I get into a strait place, I can do not better than act according to what appears most correct.
I do not intend the opinon that I have hastily [p. 5]
I will now give you my opinion in relation to this matter. It is made up from the spirit of the times in a hasty manner; nevertheless I think time will prove it to be correct:
That Congress will pass no act in relation to or at present. She is afraid of , afraid of and afraid the presidential Election will be twisted by it. The members all appear like unskilful players at chequers afraid to move, for they see not which way to move advantageously. All are figuring and playing round the grand and important questions. In the days of our Lord, the people neglected the weightier matters of the law, but tithed mint, rue, annis, and cummin, but I think here in they do little else than tithe the mint.
A member of Congress is in no enviable situation. If he will boldly advocate true principles, he loses his influence and becomes unpopular; and whoever is committed and has lost his influence, has no power to benefit his constituents: so they all go to figuring and playing round the great points. said that Mr. Smith could not constitutionally be constituted a member of the Army by law; and this, if nothing else would prevent its passage. I observed that I would, in that case, strike out that clause. Prehaps I took an unwarrantable responsibility upon myself; but where I get into a strait place, I can do not better than act according to what appears most correct.
I do not intend the opinon that I have hastily [p. 5]
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