Letter from Sidney Rigdon, 27 March 1843

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been said by me has been said to your face all of which you know as well as I. As to your rights in the Post office you have just the same as any other man In the new case which occured yesterday I have examined all the laws and rules in this office and find but one section in relation to it and that indirectly. but gives the Post Master no right to abate the postage nor make any disposition of the letter or letters, but address the Department, and they will give such instruction in the case as they may deem correct I have written, on the subject to the Department
I can conclude by only saying that <​I​> had hoped that all former difficulties had ceased forever on my part they were never mentioned to any person nor a subject of discourse at any time nor in any place I was tired hearing of them, and was in hopes that they slumbered forever, while at the subject was never once mentioned. The only thing was the inquiry I made myself to find out as far as could whether the report made to me by was correct or no and this in relation to myself only. If being intirely silent on the subject at all times and in all places is an error then I am guilty. If evading the subject at all times when ever introduced by others be a crime then I am guilty for such is my uniform custom. If this letter is not satisfactory let me know wherein for it is peace I want. I have been interrupted a great many times since I began to write by people calling at the office
Respectfully
P. S.
I do consider it a matter of just offence to me to hear about ’s assisting me to office I shall have a lower opinion of myself than I now have when I think I need his assistance
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been said by me has been said to your face all of which you know as well as I. As to your rights in the Post office you have just the same as any other man In the new case which occured yesterday I have examined all the laws and rules in this office and find but one section in relation to it and that indirectly. but gives the Post Master no right to abate the postage nor make any disposition of the letter or letters, but address the Department, and they will give such instruction in the case as they may deem correct I have written, on the subject to the Department
I can conclude by only saying that I had hoped that all former difficulties had ceased forever on my part they were never mentioned to any person nor a subject of discourse at any time nor in any place I was tired hearing of them, and was in hopes that they slumbered forever, while at the subject was never once mentioned. The only thing was the inquiry I made myself to find out as far as could whether the report made to me by was correct or no and this in relation to myself only. If being intirely silent on the subject at all times and in all places is an error then I am guilty. If evading the subject at all times when ever introduced by others be a crime then I am guilty for such is my uniform custom. If this letter is not satisfactory let me know wherein for it is peace I want. I have been interrupted a great many times since I began to write by people calling at the office
Respectfully
P. S.
I do consider it a matter of just offence to me to hear about ’s assisting me to office I shall have a lower opinion of myself than I now have when I think I need his assistance
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