Letter to James Arlington Bennet, 8 September 1842

  • Source Note
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and the real facts in relation to this people, and their unrelenting persecution. And if any man, feels an interest in the welfare of their fellow-beings, and would think of saying or doing any thing in this matter, I would suggest the propriety of a committee of wise men being sent, to ascertain the justice or injustice of our cause to get in possession of all the facts; and then make report to an enlightened world, wether we individually, or collectively, are deserving such high-handed treatment.
In relation to the books that you sent here, put them into my , to be sold on commission saying, that when I were able, the money must be remitted to yourself. Nothing was said about any consecration to the .
Another calamity has befallen us; our Post Office in this place is exceedingly corrupt. It is with great difficulty that we can get our letters to or from our friends. Our letters are broken open and robbed of their contents— Our papers that we send to our sub[s]cribers, are embezzeled, and burned or wasted. We get no money from our subcribers, and very little information from abroad; and what little we do get, we get by private means, in consequence of these things. And I am sorry to say, that this robbing of the Post Office— of money was carried on by , and since he left here, it is carried on by the means of his confederate
I now subscribe myself your friend, and a patriot and lover of my country, pleading at their feet for protection, and deliverance by the justice of their constitutions. I add no more. Your most obedient servant.
Joseph Smith.
P. S. I have dictated this letter while my clerk is writing for me [p. 8]
and the real facts in relation to this people, and their unrelenting persecution. And if any man, feels an interest in the welfare of their fellow-beings, and would think of saying or doing any thing in this matter, I would suggest the propriety of a committee of wise men being sent, to ascertain the justice or injustice of our cause to get in possession of all the facts; and then make report to an enlightened world, wether we individually, or collectively, are deserving such high-handed treatment.
In relation to the books that you sent here, put them into my , to be sold on commission saying, that when I were able, the money must be remitted to yourself. Nothing was said about any consecration to the .
Another calamity has befallen us; our Post Office in this place is exceedingly corrupt. It is with great difficulty that we can get our letters to or from our friends. Our letters are broken open and robbed of their contents— Our papers that we send to our subscribers, are embezzeled, and burned or wasted. We get no money from our subcribers, and very little information from abroad; and what little we do get, we get by private means, in consequence of these things. And I am sorry to say, that this robbing of the Post Office— of money was carried on by , and since he left here, it is carried on by the means of his confederate
I now subscribe myself your friend, and a patriot and lover of my country, pleading at their feet for protection, and deliverance by the justice of their constitutions. I add no more. Your most obedient servant.
Joseph Smith.
P. S. I have dictated this letter while my clerk is writing for me [p. 8]
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