Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [7], bk. 16
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room for them. it was enough to make the heart ache to rear <​see​> children in the open sun and wind sick with colds and very hungry crying round their mothers for food and their parents destitute of the means of making them comfortable while their houses which lay a short distance from the were pillaged of every thing eatable their fields thrown open for the horses belonging to mob to lay waste and destroy and their fat cattle shot down and turning to carrion before their eyes while a strong guard which was set over us for the purpose prevented us from making use of a particle of the stock that was killed on every side of us— <​here relate s​>
The brethren had been warn Many
It may be said that this evil certainly might have been provided against if Joseph Smith had the spirit of prophecy to this I reply that he did all in his power to get the brethren to move into the before they heard of the mob but they did not hearken to council and let this be an everlasting warning to the saints not to reject the councill of the authorities of the church because they do not understand the reason of its being given you. if the brethren ha at had observed to do what they were advised repeatedly to do their lives would no doubt have been preserved for they would have been at with the rest of the brethren I shall not attempt here to give a detail of facts which are already published my mind is loath to dwell upon these days of sorrow and more than is necessary my readers will will find a relation of these many things in the various publications which were writen during that year and the year following the on that will [be] Satisfactory to them on things which I did not see but and therfore shall not attempt to write— When began to be able to walk he went to the stable to see after his horse and not finding him he enquired of one of the mob officers where his horse was— And the officers replied that [p. [7], bk. 16]
room for them. it was enough to make the heart ache to see children in the open sun and wind sick with colds and very hungry crying round their mothers for food and their parents destitute of the means of making them comfortable while their houses which lay a short distance from the were pillaged of every thing eatable their fields thrown open for the horses belonging to mob to lay waste and destroy and their fat cattle shot down and turning to carrion before their eyes while a strong guard which was set over us for the purpose prevented us from making use of a particle of the stock that was killed on every side of us—
It may be said that this evil certainly might have been provided against if Joseph Smith had the spirit of prophecy to this I reply that he did all in his power to get the brethren to move into the before they heard of the mob but they did not hearken to council and let this be an everlasting warning to the saints not to reject the councill of the authorities of the church because they do not understand the reason of its being given if the brethren at had observed to do what they were advised repeatedly to do their lives would no doubt have been preserved for they would have been at with the rest of the brethren I shall not attempt here to give a detail of facts which are already published my mind is loath to dwell upon these days of sorrow more than is necessary my readers will will find a relation of many things in the various publications which were writen during that year and the year following that will [be] Satisfactory to them things which I did not see and therfore shall not attempt to write— When began to be able to walk he went to the stable to see after his horse and not finding him he enquired of one of the mob officers where his horse was— And the officers replied that [p. [7], bk. 16]
Page [7], bk. 16