Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [9], bk. 16
image
own family and 2 of our sons in law and their families and this was our dependence for a place to ride and to convey all our baggage my youngest son was in company with us he rode with his and children in a one horse buggy and the greatest part of their baggage was in our waggon. In consequence of our crowded situation we left a large stock of provision and most of our furniture bo in boxes and barrels in the house— but that was not the worst for our horses were what is termed wind broken and every hill which we came to we were obliged to get out and walk which was both tiresome to the patience and the body. The first day we arrived at the house one Mr. a place called Tinney’s grove where we lodged in an old log house and spent a rather uncomfortable manner the day after I travelled on foot half the day and at night came to the house of one Mr. Thomas who was then a member of the Church My was very much out of health as he had not yet recovered from the shock occarioned [occasioned] by the ca[p]ture of and Joseph and he suffered much with a sever[e] cough the 3thd day in the afternoon we co it commenced raining when night arrived we stopped at a house and asked permission to stay over night the Man of the house showed us a miserable out door house which filthy enough to sicken the stomach even to look at it and told us if we would clean this place out and haul our own wood we might lodge there as to wood that was so far off that at the late hour in which we arrived there it was not possible to get any but we cleaned out the place so that as to be able to lay our beds down and <​here we​> spent the night without fire the next morning we demanded our and the landlord charged us 75 cents for the use of this shed and we went on in the pouring rain we asked for shelter at many places but were refused [p. [9], bk. 16]
own family and 2 of our sons in law and their families and this was our dependence for a place to ride and to convey all our baggage my youngest son was in company with us he rode with his and children in a one horse buggy and the greatest part of their baggage was in our waggon. In consequence of our crowded situation we left a large stock of provision and most of our furniture in boxes and barrels in the house— but that was not the worst for our horses were what is termed wind broken and every hill which we came to we were obliged to get out and walk which was both tiresome to the patience and the body. The first day we arrived at a place called Tinney’s grove where we lodged in an old log house and spent a rather uncomfortable manner the day after I travelled on foot half the day and at night came to the house of one Mr. Thomas who was then a member of the Church My was very much out of health as he had not recovered from the shock occarioned occasioned by the capture of and Joseph and he suffered much with a severe cough the 3thd day in the afternoon it commenced raining when night arrived we stopped at a house and asked permission to stay over night the Man of the house showed us a miserable out house which filthy enough to sicken the stomach even to look at it and told us if we would clean this place out and haul our own wood we might lodge there we cleaned out the place so as to be able to lay our beds down and here we spent the night the next morning the landlord charged us 75 cents for the use of this shed and we went on in the pouring rain we asked for shelter at many places but were refused [p. [9], bk. 16]
Page [9], bk. 16