Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [12], bk. 17
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They waited upon his excelency and for sometime they had not opportunity of laying their grievances before him as he chose rather to give his attention to the frivolous compliments <​chat​> of visitors who had no other buisness but to compliment him upon his fine circumstances than to lend an ear to the complaints of a distressed people over Whom he had the jurisdiction and who looked to him and his heartless associates for protection and redress— At length however he concluded to listen to them and after hearing this the entire history of our oppression and the abuse which we had received from the our commencement of our existence as a people until the slaughter of our brethren at and our final expulsion from our own firesides homes concluding with an appeal to him for his assistance as the principle officer of this <​great​> mighty republic— has not every one read our tale of woe if you have not make I beseech you to take the trouble to do so I have not told the half but if you will p[e]ruse a pamphlet entitled (<​​> Persecution) you will then be able to appreciate this mighty re Magnanimous reply of this mighty ruler of a mighty republic when his heart was under the fresh influence of the story of his people’s Grief hear
Hear it ye nations Hear it oh ye deal [deaf?].
Gentlemen your cause is just but I can do nothing for you You that at the peril of your lives your fortunes and your sacred honor stepped forth and were placed your names upon the list attached to the declaration of independance book and nobly stood a targets for vengeanc of the oppressor willing to sacrifice your own lives to save your coutrymen Look down upon Your children— Spirit of our departed Washington listen for a moment <​but little​> did you expect that sacred seat which you so lately occupied would in and in which you dealt out even hande[d] justice to all would so very [s]oon be filled by one that can do nothing for even your own [p. [12], bk. 17]
They waited upon his excelency for sometime they had not opportunity of laying their grievances before him as he chose rather to give his attention to the frivolous chat of visitors who had no other buisness but to compliment him upon his fine circumstances than to lend an ear to the complaints of a distressed people over Whom he had the jurisdiction and who looked to him and his heartless associates for protection and redress— At length however he concluded to listen to them and after hearing the entire history of our oppression and the abuse which we had received from our commencement of our existence as a people until the slaughter of our brethren at and our final expulsion from our own homes concluding with an appeal to him for his assistance as the principle officer of this great mighty republic— has not every one read our tale of woe if you have not I beseech you to take the trouble to do so I have not told the half but if you will peruse a pamphlet entitled ( Persecution) you will then be able to appreciate this Magnanimous reply of this mighty ruler of a mighty republic when his heart was under the fresh influence of the story of his people’s Grief
Hear it ye nations Hear it oh ye deal [deaf?].
Gentlemen your cause is just but I can do nothing for you You that at the peril of your lives your fortunes and your sacred honor stepped forth and placed your names upon the list attached to the declaration of independance and nobly stood targets for vengeanc of the oppressor willing to sacrifice your own lives to save your coutrymen Look down upon Your children— Spirit of our departed Washington but little did you expect that sacred seat which you so lately occupied and in which you dealt out even handed justice to all would so very soon be filled by one that can do nothing for even your own [p. [12], bk. 17]
Page [12], bk. 17