Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 181
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’s shoulder said “you are my prisoner.”
I entreated the Officer to allow me time to get some one to go my ’s security; but he refused. I then requested, I that he might be permitted to eat the porridge which I had been preparing; as he had taken no nourishment since the night before. This was also denied.
And the Quaker ordered my to get immediately into a wagon, which stood waiting to convey him to prison. After they had taken to the wagon, the Quaker stood over him as guard, and the Officer came back and eat up the food, which I had prepared for my ; who sat in the burning sun, faint and sick, while I was serving up his dinner to the constable. I shall make no remarks in regard to my feelings on this occasion. Any human heart can imagine how I felt. But verily, verily; they shall have their reward. They drove off with my , leaving me alone, with my little . The next morning, I went on foot several miles, to see a friend by the name of Abner Lackey; who, I hoped, would assist me; and was not disappointed. He went without delay to the Magistrate’s office, and had my papers prepared, so that I could get my out of the prison cell, although he would still be confined in the jail yard.
Shortly after I returned home, a pert young gentleman came in, and asked, if Mr. was at home. I told him, as I had others, that he was in . The young man said, that was owing a small debt to Dr Mackintire and, that he had come to collect it, by the Dr’s order, as he (Mc’intire) was from home I told the young man, that this debt was to be paid in corn and beans; should [p. 181]
’s shoulder said “you are my prisoner.”
I entreated the Officer to allow me time to get some one to go my ’s security; but he refused. I then requested, I that he might be permitted to eat the porridge which I had been preparing; as he had taken no nourishment since the night before. This was also denied.
And the Quaker ordered my to get immediately into a wagon, which stood waiting to convey him to prison. After they had taken to the wagon, the Quaker stood over him as guard, and the Officer came back and eat up the food, which I had prepared for my ; who sat in the sun, faint and sick, while I was serving up his dinner to the constable. I shall make no remarks in regard to my feelings on this occasion. Any human heart can imagine how I felt. But verily, verily; they shall have their reward. They drove off with my , leaving me alone, with my little . The next morning, I went on foot several miles, to see a friend by the name of Abner Lackey; who, I hoped, would assist me; and was not disappointed. He went without delay to the Magistrate’s office, and had my papers prepared, so that I could get my out of the prison cell, although he would still be confined in the jail yard.
Shortly after I returned home, a pert young gentleman came in, and asked, if Mr. was at home. I told him, as I had others, that he was in . The young man said, that was owing a small debt to Dr Mackintire and, that he had come to collect it, by the Dr’s order, as he (Mc’intire) was from home I told the young man, that this debt was to be paid in corn and beans; should [p. 181]
Page 181