Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ed to see him. The next day, he preached a sermon; and the following were a part of his remarks: “Brethren I am glad to rejoiced to see you, and I have no doubt but you are glad to see me. We are now nearly as happy as we can be on Earth— we have accomplished more than we had any reason to expect when we began— our beautiful is finished; and the Lord has acknowledged it, by pouring out his spirit upon us here, and revealing to us much of his will with regard to the work which he is about to perform. Futhermore, we have everything that is necessary to our comfort and conveinience; and judging from appearances, one would not suppose that anything could occur which would break up our friendship for each other, or disturb our tranquility; but brethren, beware; for I tell you in the name of the Lord, there is an evil in this <​very​> congregation, which, if not repented of, will result in setting one third <​many​> of you, who are here this day, so much at enmity against me that you will have a desire to take my life; and you even would do it if God should permit the deed. But brethren, I now call upon you to repent, and cease all your hardness of heart, and turn from those principles of death and dishonesty which you are harboring in your bosom before it is eternally too late for there is yet is room for repentance.”
He continued to labor with them in this way, appealing to them in the most solemn manner, until almost every one in the house was in tears, and he was exhausted with speaking.
The following week was spent in surmises and speculations, as to who would be the traitors; and why they should be so &c &c.
Prior to this <​In the fall of 1836​> a bank was established in . Soon after the sermon above mentioned, Joseph discovered, that a large amount of money had been taken away from this bank by fraud. He immediately demanded demanded a search warrant of ; which was flatly refused. “I insist upon a warrant,” said Joseph; “for if you will give me one I can get the money; and if you do not, I will break you of your office.”
“Well, break it is then,” said , “and we will strike hands [p. 234]
ed to see him. The next day, he preached a sermon; and the following were a part of his remarks: “Brethren I am rejoiced to see you, and I have no doubt but you are glad to see me. We are now nearly as happy as we can be on Earth— we have accomplished more than we had any reason to expect when we began— our beautiful is finished; and the Lord has acknowledged it, by pouring out his spirit upon us here, and revealing to us much of his will with regard to the work which he is about to perform. Futhermore, we have everything that is necessary to our comfort and conveinience; and judging from appearances, one would not suppose that anything could occur which would break up our friendship for each other, or disturb our tranquility; but brethren, beware; for I tell you in the name of the Lord, there is an evil in this very congregation, which, if not repented of, will result in setting many of you, who are here this day, so much at enmity against me that you will have a desire to take my life; and you even would do it if God should permit the deed. But brethren, I now call upon you to repent, and cease all your hardness of heart, and turn from those principles of death and dishonesty which you are harboring in your bosom before it is eternally too late for there is yet room for repentance.”
He continued to labor with them in this way, appealing to them in the most solemn manner, until almost every one in the house was in tears, and he was exhausted with speaking.
The following week was spent in surmises and speculations, as to who would be the traitors; and why they should be so &c &c.
In the fall of 1836 a bank was established in . Soon after the sermon above mentioned, Joseph discovered, that a large amount of money had been taken away from this bank by fraud. He immediately demanded demanded a search warrant of ; which was flatly refused. “I insist upon a warrant,” said Joseph; “for if you will give me one I can get the money; and if you do not, I will break you of your office.”
“Well, break it is then,” said , “and we will strike hands [p. 234]
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