Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 239
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him most shamefully, in the presence of strangers; and he exacted 50 dollars of him, which borrowed of brother , who happened there just at that time from , and paid Jesse this sum in order to save farther trouble. The meekness manifested by upon this occasion, won upon the feelings of many who said that Jesse had disgraced himself so much that he never would redeem his character.
From Ogdensburg we went to Ogdensburg, where to our joy we found , who had raised up a small branch in that place. These were the first Mormons we had seen in travelling 300 miles. On the of October we returned home.
About one year after my returned from this mission a callamity happened to our family that wrung our hearts with more than common grief, , ’s wife was taken sick; and after an illness of perhaps two weeks died, while her was absent on a Mission to She was a woman whom every one loved, who was acquainted with her; for she was every way worthy. The family were so attached to her, that had she been an own sister they could not have been more afflicted by her death. [p. 239]
him most shamefully, in the presence of strangers; and he exacted 50 dollars of him, which borrowed of brother , who happened there just at that time from , and paid Jesse this sum in order to save farther trouble. The meekness manifested by upon this occasion, won upon the feelings of many who said that Jesse had disgraced himself so much that he never would redeem his character.
From we went to Ogdensburg, where to our joy we found , who had raised up a small branch in that place. These were the first Mormons we had seen in travelling 300 miles. On the of October we returned home.
About one year after my returned from this mission a callamity happened to our family that wrung our hearts with more than common grief, , ’s wife was taken sick; and after an illness of perhaps two weeks died, while her was absent on a Mission to She was a woman whom every one loved, who was acquainted with her; for she was every way worthy. The family were so attached to her, that had she been an own sister they could not have been more afflicted by her death. [p. 239]
Page 239