Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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My brother was in the city of in 1812; the year of Hull’s campaign; by whom the was surrendered to the Brittish Crown <​Gen. Brock.​>. He, being somewhat celebrated for his prowess, was selected by Gen. Hull to take the command of the <​a​> company as Cap. After a short service in this office he was ordered to surrender. At this his indignation was roused to the highest pitch— he severed his sword across his knee, and throwing it into the Lake, exclaimed: that he would never submit to such a disgraceful compromise, while the blood of an American continued to run through his veins. This drew the especial vengeance of the army upon his head; and his property doubtless would have been sacrificed to their resentment, had they known the situation of his affairs; but this they did not know, as his housekeeper deceived them by a stratagem; related by Mr. Stanly, as follows:—
“At the surrender of , the Maj., not having as yet moved his family hither, had an elderly lady, by the name of Trotwine, keeping house for him. The old lady took in some of the most distinguished <​brittish​> officers as boarders. She justified them in their course of conduct towards the Yankees; and, by her shrewdness and tact, she gained the esteem of the officers, and thus secured through them, the good will of the soldiery, so far as to prevent their burning (what they supposed to be) her store and dwelling:— both of which were splendid buildings.
“The Maj. never forgot this service done him by the old lady; for he ever afterwards sustained her hansomely.”
¶ Thus, was a great amount of goods and money saved from the hands of his enemies. But this is [p. 22]
My brother was in the city of in 1812; the year of Hull’s campaign; by whom the was surrendered to the Brittish Crown . He, being somewhat celebrated for his prowess, was selected by Gen. Hull to take the command of the company as Cap. After a short service in this office he was ordered to surrender. At this his indignation was roused to the highest pitch— he severed his sword across his knee, and throwing it into the Lake, exclaimed: that he would never submit to such a disgraceful compromise, while the blood of an American continued to run through his veins. This drew the especial vengeance of the army upon his head; and his property doubtless would have been sacrificed to their resentment, had they known the situation of his affairs; but this they did not know, as his housekeeper deceived them by a stratagem; related by Mr. Stanly, as follows:—
“At the surrender of , the Maj., not having as yet moved his family hither, had an elderly lady, by the name of Trotwine, keeping house for him. The old lady took in some of the most distinguished brittish officers as boarders. She justified them in their course of conduct towards the Yankees; and, by her shrewdness and tact, she gained the esteem of the officers, and thus secured through them, the good will of the soldiery, so far as to prevent their burning (what they supposed to be) her store and dwelling:— both of which were splendid buildings.
“The Maj. never forgot this service done him by the old lady; for he ever afterwards sustained her hansomely.”
¶ Thus, was a great amount of goods and money saved from the hands of his enemies. But this is [p. 22]
Page 22