Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 323
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an hour; during which time, a man named Fitch, came in at the head of 12 other mobbers, who had large hickory clubs— and they sat down with their hats on. When cousin took his seat, I arose and addressed them for an hour and a half. During which time I told them that I was a patriot,— that I was free— that I loved liberty— that I despised both mobs and mobbers;— and, that no gentleman or christian at heart would ever be guilty of such things, or countenance them. At last the mob pulled off their hats, laid down their clubs, and listened with almost breathless attention.
After meeting Mr. Fitch came to us and said: ‘that he was ashamed of his conduct, and would never do the like again; that he had been misinformed about us by some religious bigots.
We continued our journey until we reached the town of Columbus, Hickman county, Kentuckey. Here we put up with Captain Robinson (formerly an officer in the army,) who treated us very kindly, assuring us that we were welcome to stay at his house until a boat should come, if it were three mo[n]ths. While here a company of 1300 cherokee Indians encamped on the bank of the river to wait for ferry privileges. They felt deeply wounded at leaving their native country for the west— they said they were leaving a fine country, rich in minerals; but the whites; but the whites knew very little of its value. This excited our sympathies very much: little did I think that my own and helpless babes were objects of greater sympathy than these.
At length a boat came along, and we went on [p. 323]
an hour; during which time, a man named Fitch, came in at the head of 12 other mobbers, who had large hickory clubs— and they sat down with their hats on. When cousin took his seat, I arose and addressed them for an hour and a half. During which time I told them that I was a patriot,— that I was free— that I loved liberty— that I despised both mobs and mobbers;— and, that no gentleman or christian at heart would ever be guilty of such things, or countenance them. At last the mob pulled off their hats, laid down their clubs, and listened with almost breathless attention.
After meeting Mr. Fitch came to us and said: ‘that he was ashamed of his conduct, and would never do the like again; that he had been misinformed about us by some religious bigots.
We continued our journey until we reached the town of Columbus, Hickman county, Kentuckey. Here we put up with Captain Robinson (formerly an officer in the army,) who treated us very kindly, assuring us that we were welcome to stay at his house until a boat should come, if it were three months. While here a company of 1300 cherokee Indians encamped on the bank of the river to wait for ferry privileges. They felt deeply wounded at leaving their native country for the west— they said they were leaving a fine country, rich in minerals; ; but the whites knew very little of its value. This excited our sympathies very much: little did I think that my own and helpless babes were objects of greater sympathy than these.
At length boat came along, and we went on [p. 323]
Page 323