Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 56
image
goods in order to assist our children; besides, as is quite natural, we looked forward to the decline of life, and were making provisions for its wants, as well as its comforts. And, as our children had in a measure been debarred the privilege of schools, we began to make arrangements to attend to this important duty. To this end we established our second Son () in an academy at Hanover; and the rest that were of sufficient age, we sent to a common school, which was quite convenient; meanwhile and were doing all that our abilities would admit of, for the future welfare and advantage of the family, and were greatly blessed in our labors.
But this state of things did not long continue. The typhus fever came into Lebanon, and raged tremendously; and among the number seized with this complaint; was first , and then , who was taken while at School and came home sick; next was attacked: in short, one after another was taken down, till all of the family, with the exception of myself and , were prostrated upon a bed<​s​> of sickness.
had a heavy seige. The physician tended upon her 89 days; but, on the 90th day, he said, she was so far gone, that medcine could be of would be of no benefit to her; consequently he discontinued his visits. That night she lay altogether motionless, with her eyes wide open; and with that peculiar aspect which bespeaks the near approach of death. As she thus lay, I gazed upon her, as a mother looks upon the last shade of the life of in a darling child. In this moment [p. 56]
goods in order to assist our children; besides, as is quite natural, we looked forward to the decline of life, and were making provisions for its wants, as well as its comforts. And, as our children had in a measure been debarred the privilege of schools, we began to make arrangements to attend to this important duty. To this end we established our second Son () in an academy at Hanover; and the rest that were of sufficient age, we sent to a common school, which was quite convenient; meanwhile and were doing all that our abilities would admit of, for the future welfare and advantage of the family, and were greatly blessed in our labors.
But this state of things did not long continue. The typhus fever came into Lebanon, and raged tremendously; and among the number seized with this complaint; was first , and then , who was taken while at School and came home sick; next was attacked: in short, one after another was taken down, till all of the family, with the exception of myself and , were prostrated upon beds of sickness.
had a heavy seige. The physician tended upon her 89 days; but, on the 90th day, he said, she was so far gone, that medcine would be of no benefit to her; consequently he discontinued his visits. That night she lay altogether motionless, with her eyes wide open; and with that peculiar aspect which bespeaks the near approach of death. As she thus lay, I gazed upon her, as a mother looks upon the last shade of life in a darling child. In this moment [p. 56]
Page 56