Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, 28 November 1843

  • Source Note
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and some two or three of their Assailants were killed. This unfortunate affair raised the whole in Arms, and we were required forthwith to Surrender our arms and leave the . Fifty one Guns were given up, which have never been returned or paid for to this day. Parties of the Mob from 30 to 70 in number then scoured the Country in every direction, threatening and abusing Women and Children, until they were forced, first to take shelter in the woods and prairies at a very inclement Season of the year, and finally to make their escape to , where the people permitted them to take refuge for a time.
After the Society had left , their buildings amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise destroyed, with a great portion of their crops, as well as furniture, stock &c for which they have not as yet received any remuneration. The Society remained in , nearly three years, when in compliance with the demands of the Citizens there, it was determined to remove to that Section of Country, known afterwards as . In order to secure our people from molestation, the members of the Society bought out most of the former Inhabitants of what is now , and also entered much of the wild land, then belonging to the in that Section of Country, fondly hoping that as we were American Citizens, obeying the laws, and assisting to support the government, we would be protected in the use of homes which we had honestly purchased from the general government and fully paid for. Here we were permitted to enjoy peace for a Season, but as our Society increased in numbers, and settlements were made in and Carrol Counties, unfounded jealousies sprung up among our neighbors, and the spirit of the Mob was soon manifested again. The people of our Church who had located themselves at , were compelled by the Mob to leave the place,— notwithstanding the Militia were called out for their protection. From the mob went to , and while on their way took some of our people prisoners and greatly abused and mistreated them. Our people had been driven by force from ; they had been compelled to leave and sell their lands there, for which they have never been paid; they had finally settled in where they had purchased and paid for nearly all the Government land within its limits, in order to secure homes where they could live and worship in peace, but even here they were soon followed by the Mob. The Society remained in from 1836 until the fall of 1838, and during that time had acquired, by purchase from the Government, the Settlers, and preemptions, almost all the lands in the County of , and a portion of those in and Carrol Counties. Those Counties when our people first commenced their Settlements were for the most part wild and uncultivated, and they had converted them into large and well improved farms, well stocked. Lands had risen in value from ten to 25 dollars per acre, and those Counties were rapidly advancing in Cultivation and wealth. In August 1838 a riot commenced growing out of the attempt of a member of the Society to vote, which resulted in creating great— excitement and many scenes of lawless outrage. A large mob under the conduct of came into the vicinity of , drive off our Stock and abused our people, another party came into , took away our horses and cattle, burnt our houses, and ordered the inhabitants to leave their homes immediately.
By orders of and a company of about 60 men went to disperse this mob under the command of . A conflict ensued in which and two of his men were killed and others wounded. A mob party from two to three hundred in number, many of whom are supposed to have come from , fell on our people and notwithstanding they begged for quarters [p. 2]
and some two or three of their Assailants were killed. This unfortunate affair raised the whole in Arms, and we were required forthwith to Surrender our arms and leave the . Fifty one Guns were given up, which have never been returned or paid for to this day. Parties of the Mob from 30 to 70 in number then scoured the Country in every direction, threatening and abusing Women and Children, until they were forced, first to take shelter in the woods and prairies at a very inclement Season of the year, and finally to make their escape to , where the people permitted them to take refuge for a time.
After the Society had left , their buildings amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise destroyed, with a great portion of their crops, as well as furniture, stock &c for which they have not as yet received any remuneration. The Society remained in , nearly three years, when in compliance with the demands of the Citizens there, it was determined to remove to that Section of Country, known afterwards as . In order to secure our people from molestation, the members of the Society bought out most of the former Inhabitants of what is now , and also entered much of the wild land, then belonging to the in that Section of Country, fondly hoping that as we were American Citizens, obeying the laws, and assisting to support the government, we would be protected in the use of homes which we had honestly purchased from the general government and fully paid for. Here we were permitted to enjoy peace for a Season, but as our Society increased in numbers, and settlements were made in and Carrol Counties, unfounded jealousies sprung up among our neighbors, and the spirit of the Mob was soon manifested again. The people of our Church who had located themselves at , were compelled by the Mob to leave the place,— notwithstanding the Militia were called out for their protection. From the mob went to , and while on their way took some of our people prisoners and greatly abused and mistreated them. Our people had been driven by force from ; they had been compelled to leave and sell their lands there, for which they have never been paid; they had finally settled in where they had purchased and paid for nearly all the Government land within its limits, in order to secure homes where they could live and worship in peace, but even here they were soon followed by the Mob. The Society remained in from 1836 until the fall of 1838, and during that time had acquired, by purchase from the Government, the Settlers, and preemptions, almost all the lands in the County of , and a portion of those in and Carrol Counties. Those Counties when our people first commenced their Settlements were for the most part wild and uncultivated, and they had converted them into large and well improved farms, well stocked. Lands had risen in value from ten to 25 dollars per acre, and those Counties were rapidly advancing in Cultivation and wealth. In August 1838 a riot commenced growing out of the attempt of a member of the Society to vote, which resulted in creating great— excitement and many scenes of lawless outrage. A large mob under the conduct of came into the vicinity of , drive off our Stock and abused our people, another party came into , took away our horses and cattle, burnt our houses, and ordered the inhabitants to leave their homes immediately.
By orders of and a company of about 60 men went to disperse this mob under the command of . A conflict ensued in which and two of his men were killed and others wounded. A mob party from two to three hundred in number, many of whom are supposed to have come from , fell on our people and notwithstanding they begged for quarters [p. 2]
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