Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and others again toiled in the occupation of the mechanic. They were industrious and moral; they prospered; and though often persecuted and vilified for their difference in religious opinions, from their other <​fellow​> citizens, still they were happy. They saw their society increasing in numbers; their farms teemed with plenty; and they fondly looked forward to a future big with hope. That there was prejudice existing against them <​they knew; that slanders were propogated against them​> they deplored; yet they felt that these things were unmerited and unjust; that time and an upright conduct would outgrow them in this enlightened age of the world. While this summer of peace and happiness and hope beamed upon them, and shone over the infant settlement of the “,” the dark cloud that bore in its bosom the thunderbolt of their destruction was gathering fast around them, pregnant with prejudice, oppression and destruction <​final expulsion or extermination​>.
On the 20th of July 1833 around their peaceful village, a mob gathered to the surprise and terror of the quiet, unoffending Mormons; why, they knew not. They had broken no law; they had harmed no man in deed or thought. Why then were they thus threatened and abused? Soon a Committee from the mob called upon the leading “Saints” of the place, and issued forth the mandate that the stores, the , and the work shops must all be closed; and that forthwith every Mormon must leave the .
The message was so terrible, so unexpected, the “Saints” asked time for deliberation, for consultation; which being refused, the Brethren were severally asked “Are you willing to abandon your homes?” the reply was such as became freemen living in a [p. 2]
and others again toiled in the occupation of the mechanic. They were industrious and moral; they prospered; and though often persecuted and vilified for their difference in religious opinions, from their fellow citizens, still they were happy. They saw their society increasing in numbers; their farms teemed with plenty; and they fondly looked forward to a future big with hope. That there was prejudice existing against them they knew; that slanders were propogated against them they deplored; yet they felt that these things were unmerited and unjust; that time and an upright conduct would outgrow them in this enlightened age of the world. While this summer of peace and happiness and hope beamed upon them, and shone over the infant settlement of the “,” the dark cloud that bore in its bosom the thunderbolt of their destruction was gathering fast around them, pregnant with prejudice, oppression and final expulsion or extermination.
On the 20th of July 1833 around their peaceful village, a mob gathered to the surprise and terror of the quiet, unoffending Mormons; why, they knew not. They had broken no law; they had harmed no man in deed or thought. Why then were they thus threatened and abused? Soon a Committee from the mob called upon the leading “Saints” of the place, and issued forth the mandate that the stores, the , and the work shops must all be closed; and that forthwith every Mormon must leave the .
The message was so terrible, so unexpected, the “Saints” asked time for deliberation, for consultation; which being refused, the Brethren were severally asked “Are you willing to abandon your homes?” the reply was such as became freemen living in a [p. 2]
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