Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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awful and critical juncture some two or three of the Mormons offered to surrender up themselves as victims, if that would satisfy the fury of the mob, and purchase peace and security for their unoffending brethren, their helpless wives, and innocent children. The reply of the mob was— the Mormons must leave the en masseor every man shall be put to death The Mormons terrified and defenceless, were thus in this manner reduced to the necessity of entering into an agreement to leave the ; one half by the first of January— the other half by the first of April next ensuing. This treaty being made and ratified, the mob dispersed. Again for a time, the persecuted Mormons enjoyed a respite from their relentless persecutors, but their repose was of short duration. Some time in the month of October a meeting was held at , at which it was determined to remove the Mormons or die. Inflammatory speeches of the most violent character were made to excite the populace; and one of the speakers went so far in his denunciations as to swear “that he would remove the Mormons from the , if he had to wade to his neck in blood.” Up to this time, the Mormons had faithfully observed the forced treaty stipulations on their part; and were guilty of no offence against either the laws of the land or of society; but were peaceably following the routine of their daily duties. Shortly after the meeting above referred to, another persecution commenced, with increased sufferings on the part of the devoted Mormons. Some of their people were shot at; others were whipped without mercy; their houses assailed with brickbats [p. 4]
awful and critical juncture some two or three of the Mormons offered to surrender up themselves as victims, if that would satisfy the fury of the mob, and purchase peace and security for their unoffending brethren, their helpless wives, and innocent children. The reply of the mob was— “the Mormons must leave the en masseor every man shall be put to death The Mormons terrified and defenceless, were in this manner reduced to the necessity of entering into an agreement to leave the ; one half by the first of January— the other half by the first of April next ensuing. This treaty being made and ratified, the mob dispersed. Again for a time, the persecuted Mormons enjoyed a respite from their relentless persecutors, but their repose was of short duration. Some time in the month of October a meeting was held at , at which it was determined to remove the Mormons or die. Inflammatory speeches of the most violent character were made to excite the populace; and one of the speakers went so far in his denunciations as to swear “that he would remove the Mormons from the , if he had to wade to his neck in blood.” Up to this time, the Mormons had faithfully observed the forced treaty stipulations on their part; and were guilty of no offence against either the laws of the land or of society; but were peaceably following the routine of their daily duties. Shortly after the meeting above referred to, another persecution commenced, with increased sufferings on the part of the devoted Mormons. Some of their people were shot at; others were whipped without mercy; their houses assailed with brickbats [p. 4]
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