Minutes and Testimonies, 12–29 November 1838 [State of Missouri v. Gates et al. for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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what they intended to do. he both of them, in their remarks observed that they meant to have the words of the presidency sustaind, that no one should speak against what they said to be as good, and undisputed as the words of God— and that no one should speak against what they said. I think that was not in at this time and I think he was not in the country—
Some time in June, steps were taken to get myself and others out of the County of , and efforts were made to get the post office from me <​I being postmaster)​> by a demand for it— <​I explained the law, which seemed satisfactory​>— & it was not given up. I then informed the second presidency of the Church by letter, that I was willing to do whatever was right, & if I had wronged any man I would make him satisfaction. — I was then notified to attend a meeting which I did— In that meeting— in an address again brought up the subject of the post office— I told them them if publick opinion said I should give it up, I would do so, but they would have to await the decision of the post-master Generl— which they agreed to do, if I would agree that a committee might with the understanding that a committee of three should inspect the letters written & sent by me, as well as those received by me. this committee however never made their appearance— After my case was disposed of, others were taken up another man’s was taken up— he attempted to [p. [85]]
what they intended to do. both of them, in their remarks observed that they meant to have the words of the presidency to be as good, and undisputed as the words of God— and that no one should speak against what they said. was not in at this time and I think he was not in the country—
Some time in June, steps were taken to get myself and others out of the County of , and efforts were made to get the post office from me I being postmaster) by a demand for it— I explained the law, which seemed satisfactory— & it was not given up. I then informed the second presidency of the Church by letter, that I was willing to do whatever was right, & if I had wronged any man I would make him satisfaction. — I was then notified to attend a meeting which I did— In that meeting— in an address again brought up the subject of the post office— I told them if publick opinion said I should give it up, I would do so, but they would have to await the decision of the post-master Generl— which they agreed to do, with the understanding that a committee of three should inspect the letters written & sent by me, as well as those received by me. this committee however never made their appearance— After my case was disposed of, another man’s was taken up— he attempted to [p. [85]]
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