Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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former murders and robberies, committed against us in . He did not pretend to deny any thing, but spoke upon the whole as frank as if he had been giving the history of some thing done in ages past, with which we were not personally concerned. He also informed us that he had been exhorted by many to hang us on the way to , but he should not suffer us to be injured. Indeed, it was now evident that he was proud of his prey, and felt highly enthusiastic in having the honor of returning in triumph to the town of , with the exhibition of his prisoners, whom his superstition had magnified into Noble or Royal personages; who would be gazed upon as Kings, or as something supernatural.
Next morning we were on our march, and in the after part of the day, we came to the , which separated between and us.— Here the brigade was halted, and the prisoners taken to a public house, where we were permitted to shave our beards and change our linen, after which we partook of an excellent dinner at the expense of the . This done, we were hurried to the ferry, and across the river with the utmost haste; when but few of the troops had passed, this movement was soon explained to us. The truth was, had sent an express to take us from , and prevent us from going to , as both armies were competitors for the honor of possessing the wonderful, or in their estimation, Royal Prisoners. and his troops from a distance, who had not arrived in the city of till after our departure, was desirous of seeing the strange men, whom it was said had turned the world upside down; and was desirous of the honor of possessing such a wonderful trophy of victory, or of putting us to death himself. And on the other hand, , and their troops, were determined to exhibit us in triumph through the streets of . Therefore when demanded by [p. 44]
former murders and robberies, committed against us in . He did not pretend to deny any thing, but spoke upon the whole as frank as if he had been giving the history of some thing done in ages past, with which we were not personally concerned. He also informed us that he had been exhorted by many to hang us on the way to , but he should not suffer us to be injured. Indeed, it was now evident that he was proud of his prey, and felt highly enthusiastic in having the honor of returning in triumph to the town of , with the exhibition of his prisoners, whom his superstition had magnified into Noble or Royal personages; who would be gazed upon as Kings, or as something supernatural.
Next morning we were on our march, and in the after part of the day, we came to the , which separated between and us.— Here the brigade was halted, and the prisoners taken to a public house, where we were permitted to shave our beards and change our linen, after which we partook of an excellent dinner at the expense of the . This done, we were hurried to the ferry, and across the river with the utmost haste; when but few of the troops had passed, this movement was soon explained to us. The truth was, had sent an express to take us from , and prevent us from going to , as both armies were competitors for the honor of possessing the wonderful, or in their estimation, Royal Prisoners. and his troops from a distance, who had not arrived in the city of till after our departure, was desirous of seeing the strange men, whom it was said had turned the world upside down; and was desirous of the honor of possessing such a wonderful trophy of victory, or of putting us to death himself. And on the other hand, , and their troops, were determined to exhibit us in triumph through the streets of . Therefore when demanded by [p. 44]
Page 44