Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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scrape and they might fight it out, for he would have nothing to do with it. This was the return made to the citizens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand with difficulties, and a mob threatening their lives, and not only threatening but using all their efforts to take them; for scouting parties were round in every dirction, stealing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could get. They set fire to a house owned by a man by the name of , and burnt it to ashes, and the man and his family barely escaped with their lives. Numbers of them died for want of proper attendance in sickness; for they had been deprived from making any provision whatever for their families, many of whom were sick, laying in wagons and in tents, without any other shelter. Many females that were in delicate situations, gave birth to children under these forbidding circumstances; and to crown all, their provisions were getting very low, and they could see nothing but actual starvation before them by continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness in their midst, made their case deplorable indeed. Parents had to stand still and witness the death of their children without the means even to make them comforable in their dying moments; and children had to do the same with their parents. The civil authorities as well as the military had all refused to do their duty, and there were many of them, at least as deeply engaged in the mob as any others. In the meantime and , who had been the sole cause of the settlement being made, solicited the Saints to leave the place. said he had assurances from the mob that if they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish this object; and that persons would be appointed to set value on the property which they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity, had to comply, and leave the place. Accordingly, the committee was appointed—Judge Erickson was one of the committee and Major Flory, of Rutsville, another—the names of the others not recollected. They appraised the real estate, that was all. When the people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could not be found—it was known at the time, and the mob boasted of it, that they had killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of cows, oxen and horses have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept. Such wagons as could get off, started. It was in the afterpart of the day, on the 11th of October, 1838, when they left for and counties. They travelled that day about twelve miles, and encamped in a grove of timber near the road. That evening a women, who had some short time before given birth to a child, in consequence of the exposure occasioned by the operations of the mobs, and having to move her before her strength would admit, died, and was buried in the grove without a coffin. There were a considerable number sick, both grown persons and children, which was principally owing to their exposure, and to their having been obliged to live in their wagons and tents so long, and being deprived of suitable food. No sooner had they started than called the mob together and made a speech to them, saying that they must hasten to assist their [p. 30]
scrape and they might fight it out, for he would have nothing to do with it. This was the return made to the citizens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand with difficulties, and a mob threatening their lives, and not only threatening but using all their efforts to take them; for scouting parties were round in every dirction, stealing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could get. They set fire to a house owned by a man by the name of , and burnt it to ashes, and the man and his family barely escaped with their lives. Numbers of them died for want of proper attendance in sickness; for they had been deprived from making any provision whatever for their families, many of whom were sick, laying in wagons and in tents, without any other shelter. Many females that were in delicate situations, gave birth to children under these forbidding circumstances; and to crown all, their provisions were getting very low, and they could see nothing but actual starvation before them by continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness in their midst, made their case deplorable indeed. Parents had to stand still and witness the death of their children without the means even to make them comforable in their dying moments; and children had to do the same with their parents. The civil authorities as well as the military had all refused to do their duty, and there were many of them, at least as deeply engaged in the mob as any others. In the meantime and , who had been the sole cause of the settlement being made, solicited the Saints to leave the place. said he had assurances from the mob that if they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish this object; and that persons would be appointed to set value on the property which they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity, had to comply, and leave the place. Accordingly, the committee was appointed—Judge Erickson was one of the committee and Major Flory, of Rutsville, another—the names of the others not recollected. They appraised the real estate, that was all. When the people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could not be found—it was known at the time, and the mob boasted of it, that they had killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of cows, oxen and horses have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept. Such wagons as could get off, started. It was in the afterpart of the day, on the 11th of October, 1838, when they left for and counties. They travelled that day about twelve miles, and encamped in a grove of timber near the road. That evening a women, who had some short time before given birth to a child, in consequence of the exposure occasioned by the operations of the mobs, and having to move her before her strength would admit, died, and was buried in the grove without a coffin. There were a considerable number sick, both grown persons and children, which was principally owing to their exposure, and to their having been obliged to live in their wagons and tents so long, and being deprived of suitable food. No sooner had they started than called the mob together and made a speech to them, saying that they must hasten to assist their [p. 30]
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