Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 41
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mons driven out; they could get all the lands entitled to pre-emptions; and that they must hasten to , in order to accomplish their object—that, if they would join, and drive them out, they could get all the lands back again, as well as all the pay they had received for them. He assured the mob, that they had nothing to fear from the authorities in so doing; for they had now, full proof that the authorities would not assist the Mormons, and that they might as well take their property from them as not. His request was complied with, and accordingly the whole banditti started; taking with them, their cannon, for . In the mean time , was busily engaged in raising a mob, in Platt, and Clinton Counties, to aid in his effort, to drive peaceable citizens, from their homes, and take their property. After the mob had left Corrill [Carroll] County, there was ordered out a part of two brigades of Militia to check their movements. Generals and , were in command of them, as it was part of their brigades that were ordered out. The first knowledge that the people of or , had of the mob, coming against them, was the arrival of a body of troops under the command of Col. Dun, of , in . As the people of , had no knowledge of any troops, designed to come into the place, their appearance caused some excitement. Both the military and civil officers, immediately met them, and enquired into the cause of their sudden appearance in the place, without giving previous notice. Their commander gave for answer, that “they had been ordered out by ; to repair to , to operate against a mob, which was on its march from Corrill County, to .” This was on the first day of the week. We have not the precise date, but it was in October. The evening following which was Monday, arrived in . In consequence of these hostile movements on the part of the mob, the people of had asssembled together to take such measures as the emergency of the case might require.
After the arrival of , the authorities made enquiry of him, concerning the matter, and the oper [p. 41]
mons driven out; they could get all the lands entitled to pre-emptions; and that they must hasten to , in order to accomplish their object—that, if they would join, and drive them out, they could get all the lands back again, as well as all the pay they had received for them. He assured the mob, that they had nothing to fear from the authorities in so doing; for they had now, full proof that the authorities would not assist the Mormons, and that they might as well take their property from them as not. His request was complied with, and accordingly the whole banditti started; taking with them, their cannon, for . In the mean time , was busily engaged in raising a mob, in Platt, and Clinton Counties, to aid in his effort, to drive peaceable citizens, from their homes, and take their property. After the mob had left Corrill [Carroll] County, there was ordered out a part of two brigades of Militia to check their movements. Generals and , were in command of them, as it was part of their brigades that were ordered out. The first knowledge that the people of or , had of the mob, coming against them, was the arrival of a body of troops under the command of Col. Dun, of , in . As the people of , had no knowledge of any troops, designed to come into the place, their appearance caused some excitement. Both the military and civil officers, immediately met them, and enquired into the cause of their sudden appearance in the place, without giving previous notice. Their commander gave for answer, that “they had been ordered out by ; to repair to , to operate against a mob, which was on its march from Corrill County, to .” This was on the first day of the week. We have not the precise date, but it was in October. The evening following which was Monday, arrived in . In consequence of these hostile movements on the part of the mob, the people of had asssembled together to take such measures as the emergency of the case might require.
After the arrival of , the authorities made enquiry of him, concerning the matter, and the oper [p. 41]
Page 41