Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 51
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While the troops were thus engaged, the officers were busily employed in forming some plan to dispose of those, whom they had betrayed into their camp. Seventeen preachers and nineteen Commissioned officers, met with Generals and and held a Court Martial. The prisoners, were never admitted into it at all: they were not allowed to plead, introduce evidence, or any thing else. Finally, the august body came to a decision; and that was, that at eight o’clock the next morning, they should be taken into the public square, in the presence of their families, and shot. Who among the military characters of the day will not say that is fit to command an army, when he was at the head of such a court martial as this?
At these high handed and lawless measures demurred. He told them, that there was not one of them, in the least degree, acquainted with the Military law, and understood nothing about court Martials; and for his part, if they were going to pursue that course, his hand should be clear of it; and he forthwith ordered his brigade to prepare; and he marched them off. This deterred the others, seeing , was the only lawyer in their number. We presume they would have carried their design into effect had it not been for ’s leaving them. We had this account from the lips of himself.
Our families had been apprised of their intentions, and were waiting in awful suspense, the arrival of the fatal hour. However, they changed their purpose, and it was decreed that we should be carried to .
While these things were carrying on, in and about , scenes still more horrid and soul-thrilling, were going on, in another part of the , at a place called , because a man of that name built a mill there. We will give this account from the pen of eye-witnesses. We will give it from the testimony of three who have testified to it; that is, and his ; and . We also, have the testimony of Mrs. A[manda Barnes] Smith, whose , and a little son of nine years of age, were killed, and also a younger boy wound [p. 51]
While the troops were thus engaged, the officers were busily employed in forming some plan to dispose of those, whom they had betrayed into their camp. Seventeen preachers and nineteen Commissioned officers, met with Generals and and held a Court Martial. The prisoners, were never admitted into it at all: they were not allowed to plead, introduce evidence, or any thing else. Finally, the august body came to a decision; and that was, that at eight o’clock the next morning, they should be taken into the public square, in the presence of their families, and shot. Who among the military characters of the day will not say that is fit to command an army, when he was at the head of such a court martial as this?
At these high handed and lawless measures demurred. He told them, that there was not one of them, in the least degree, acquainted with the Military law, and understood nothing about court Martials; and for his part, if they were going to pursue that course, his hand should be clear of it; and he forthwith ordered his brigade to prepare; and he marched them off. This deterred the others, seeing , was the only lawyer in their number. We presume they would have carried their design into effect had it not been for ’s leaving them. We had this account from the lips of himself.
Our families had been apprised of their intentions, and were waiting in awful suspense, the arrival of the fatal hour. However, they changed their purpose, and it was decreed that we should be carried to .
While these things were carrying on, in and about , scenes still more horrid and soul-thrilling, were going on, in another part of the , at a place called , because a man of that name built a mill there. We will give this account from the pen of eye-witnesses. We will give it from the testimony of three who have testified to it; that is, and his ; and . We also, have the testimony of Mrs. Amanda Barnes Smith, whose , and a little son of nine years of age, were killed, and also a younger boy wound [p. 51]
Page 51