Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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during the progress of these extraordinary scenes <​&​> all kinds of depredations were committed: men driving their teames to and from mills where they got their grinding done, would be surprised and taken, their persons abused, and their teames [w]agons, and loading, all taken as booty by the plunderers. Fields were thrown open and all within exposed to the distruction of such animals as chose to enter. Cattle, horses hogs and, sheep, were, driven off and a general system of plunder and distruction of all kinds of property carried on to the great anoyance of the citizens of , and that portion of the citizens of marked as victims by the mob. One after noon a messenger arived at calling for help, saying that a banditti had crossed the South line of and were engaged in threatning the citizens with death if they did <​not​> leave their homes and go out of the within a very short time. the time not precisely recollected; but I think it was the next day by ten oClock, but of this I am not certain. He said they were setting fire to the Prairies, in view of burning houses <​&​> desolating farms, that they had set fire to a wagon loaded with goods and they were all consumed, that they had also set fire to a house and when he left it was burning down. Such was the situation of affairs at at that time that could not spare any of his forces, as an attack was hourly expected at The messenger went off and I heard no more about it till some time, in the night following, I <​when I​> was awakened from sleep by the voice of some man apparently giving command to a military body, being some what unwell, I did not get up. Some time after I got up, in the morning, the of the stopped at the door, and said that had had a battle with the mob last night and at and that several were killed and a number wounded; that was among the number of the <​was among the number of the​> wounded, and his wound supposed to be mortal <​supposed to be mortal​> After I had taken breakfast [p. [12]]
during the progress of these extraordinary scenes & all kinds of depredations were committed: men driving their teames to and from mills where they got their grinding done, would be surprised and taken, their persons abused, and their teames wagons, and loading, all taken as booty by the plunderers. Fields were thrown open and all within exposed to the distruction of such animals as chose to enter. Cattle, horses hogs and, sheep, were, driven off and a general system of plunder and distruction of all kinds of property carried on to the great anoyance of the citizens of , and that portion of the citizens of marked as victims by the mob. One after noon a messenger arived at calling for help, saying that a banditti had crossed the South line of and were engaged in threatning the citizens with death if they did not leave their homes and go out of the within a very short time. the time not precisely recollected; but I think it was the next day by ten oClock, but of this I am not certain. He said they were setting fire to the Prairies, in view of burning houses & desolating farms, that they had set fire to a wagon loaded with goods and they were all consumed, that they had also set fire to a house and when he left it was burning down. Such was the situation of affairs at at that time that could not spare any of his forces, as an attack was hourly expected at The messenger went off and I heard no more about it till some time, in the night following, when I was awakened from sleep by the voice of some man apparently giving command to a military body, being some what unwell, I did not get up. Some time after I got up, in the morning, the of the stopped at the door, and said that had had a battle with the mob last night at and that several were killed and a number wounded; that was among the number of the wounded, and his wound supposed to be mortal After I had taken breakfast [p. [12]]
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