Times and Seasons, 1 August 1842

  • Source Note
Page 878
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which was Mayor of , General of the Nauvoo Legion, &c. &c. was soon found to be guilty of gross improprieties: such as living in open fornication, &c. for which he was frequently reasoned with by the brethren, but all to no effect. He was threatened but it done no good. Finding all remonstrance in vain, and having their name and religion frequently sneered at on this account, the “Quorum of the Twelve” excommunicated him for his wickedness. They done perfectly right, and if all our churches would mete out the same reward to backsliders, there would not be half the scoffers and revilers of religion there now is.
 
————
.
Having noticed in the Whig of last week an article written by of this place stating that he does not consider himself any longer a member of this church, that the church will not allow him to withdraw; and that certain scandalous attacks have been made against him by the saints; for what he knows not, except it is to make a scape goat of him to carry away their sins—the sins of whom he has not said. We world [would] briefly reply to his remarks.
In the first place we would state that we have no such law or statute prohibiting persons withdrawing from the church; but believe that all men are free and can do as they please, so will learn that he is in no bondage in this respect. In regard to the scandalous atttacks that have been made against him and others we would state that if telling the truth is scandal we are verily guilty.
is not so ignorant of these things as he would represent, and if he would have been content to have let the exposure rest where his delinquencies were practised, we should not have let the matter gone farther, but as he has made a parade before the public and thrown out certain inuendoes pertaining to the people in this place, we publish the following;—
I, , Do hereby Certify, that in the Spring of 1840, I bought a quantity of land of , and paid him at sundry times Four hundred and Eleven Dollars leaving a residue of $39 unpaid. Having ascertained that said had sold the same tract of land to sundry persons, and received payment therefor, I tendered him the money remaining due to said , and demanded a Deed according to the stipulations of the Bond. He refused to take the $39 and comply with the Bond. He has also cut and pillaged a large quantity of timber on the land since he sold it. [I]n fine I believe him to be a dishonest man [I?] further state that I am not a Mormon, nor ever have been, but am friendly to them.
.
CERTIFICATE OF .
Having been called upon to state circumstances connected with a contract between and myself, I now submit such facts as occur to my mind. Somewhere about the month of November, 1839, came to my house, in the vicinity of Indianapolis, in the State of Indiana; I told him I designed moving to —was desirous to be near the —enjoy their privileges of meetings, as well as the comforts of country life. He informed me that he could suit me in a place. A bargain was struck and I paid him over $300 in hand, and was to have possession of the place on my arrival in , and upon my arrival ascertained that he had previously sold the same premises to , and partly received the pay. Consequently my money was gone, and I had no place, and this was not all, the title bond that he made and gave me was esteemed defective, I was therefore left to do the best I could under the circumstances, either to enter into a suit at law or take up with such terms as he might prescribe. And by my importunities and the influence of my friends, I effected a settlement as I thought greatly to the prejudice of my interest.
.
In regard to his being a scape goat to carry the sins of others, we think that he will do pretty well if he is able to carry his own sins without fainting. We neither want to sacrifice a lamb, nor do we want a goat to carry our sins into the wilderness, we are ready to atone for our own sins and to answer for our own transgressions. We further hope that all other goats that are in our midst will pack up their sins and walk, but if when they get away they should try to pursuade the public that they are somebody’s else sins and not their own that they are packing, we may give the public information relative to the matter.
The Editor of the Whig will confer a favor by copying the foregoing.
It must be obvious to every reflecting mind that in a city comprising from ten to twelve thousand inhabitants, there must of necessity be some delinquents among them, if it were not so we should be an anomaly in the history of churches, of cities, and of the world. We make use of all prudential means, both ecclesiastical and civil, to prevent the commission of crime, and citizens from being imposed upon; in many instances we have succeeded—if in some few we should fail it cannot be thought surprising.—Ed. [p. 878]
which was Mayor of , General of the Nauvoo Legion, &c. &c. was soon found to be guilty of gross improprieties: such as living in open fornication, &c. for which he was frequently reasoned with by the brethren, but all to no effect. He was threatened but it done no good. Finding all remonstrance in vain, and having their name and religion frequently sneered at on this account, the “Quorum of the Twelve” excommunicated him for his wickedness. They done perfectly right, and if all our churches would mete out the same reward to backsliders, there would not be half the scoffers and revilers of religion there now is.
 
————
.
Having noticed in the Whig of last week an article written by of this place stating that he does not consider himself any longer a member of this church, that the church will not allow him to withdraw; and that certain scandalous attacks have been made against him by the saints; for what he knows not, except it is to make a scape goat of him to carry away their sins—the sins of whom he has not said. We world [would] briefly reply to his remarks.
In the first place we would state that we have no such law or statute prohibiting persons withdrawing from the church; but believe that all men are free and can do as they please, so will learn that he is in no bondage in this respect. In regard to the scandalous atttacks that have been made against him and others we would state that if telling the truth is scandal we are verily guilty.
is not so ignorant of these things as he would represent, and if he would have been content to have let the exposure rest where his delinquencies were practised, we should not have let the matter gone farther, but as he has made a parade before the public and thrown out certain inuendoes pertaining to the people in this place, we publish the following;—
I, , Do hereby Certify, that in the Spring of 1840, I bought a quantity of land of , and paid him at sundry times Four hundred and Eleven Dollars leaving a residue of $39 unpaid. Having ascertained that said had sold the same tract of land to sundry persons, and received payment therefor, I tendered him the money remaining due to said , and demanded a Deed according to the stipulations of the Bond. He refused to take the $39 and comply with the Bond. He has also cut and pillaged a large quantity of timber on the land since he sold it. In fine I believe him to be a dishonest man I further state that I am not a Mormon, nor ever have been, but am friendly to them.
.
CERTIFICATE OF .
Having been called upon to state circumstances connected with a contract between and myself, I now submit such facts as occur to my mind. Somewhere about the month of November, 1839, came to my house, in the vicinity of Indianapolis, in the State of Indiana; I told him I designed moving to —was desirous to be near the —enjoy their privileges of meetings, as well as the comforts of country life. He informed me that he could suit me in a place. A bargain was struck and I paid him over $300 in hand, and was to have possession of the place on my arrival in , and upon my arrival ascertained that he had previously sold the same premises to , and partly received the pay. Consequently my money was gone, and I had no place, and this was not all, the title bond that he made and gave me was esteemed defective, I was therefore left to do the best I could under the circumstances, either to enter into a suit at law or take up with such terms as he might prescribe. And by my importunities and the influence of my friends, I effected a settlement as I thought greatly to the prejudice of my interest.
.
In regard to his being a scape goat to carry the sins of others, we think that he will do pretty well if he is able to carry his own sins without fainting. We neither want to sacrifice a lamb, nor do we want a goat to carry our sins into the wilderness, we are ready to atone for our own sins and to answer for our own transgressions. We further hope that all other goats that are in our midst will pack up their sins and walk, but if when they get away they should try to pursuade the public that they are somebody’s else sins and not their own that they are packing, we may give the public information relative to the matter.
The Editor of the Whig will confer a favor by copying the foregoing.
It must be obvious to every reflecting mind that in a city comprising from ten to twelve thousand inhabitants, there must of necessity be some delinquents among them, if it were not so we should be an anomaly in the history of churches, of cities, and of the world. We make use of all prudential means, both ecclesiastical and civil, to prevent the commission of crime, and citizens from being imposed upon; in many instances we have succeeded—if in some few we should fail it cannot be thought surprising.—Ed. [p. 878]
Page 878