Times and Seasons, 1 June 1842

  • Source Note
Page 804
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they will come, they may, and partake of the waters of life freely.
16. Behold this is my doctrine: whosoever repenteth and cometh unto me, the same is my church, whosoever declareth more or less than this, the same is not of me, but is against me: therefore he is not of my church.
17. And now, behold, whosoever is of my church, and endureth of my church to the end, him will I estabish upon my Rock, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against them.
18. And now, remember the words of him who is the life and the light of the world, your Redeemer, your Lord, and your God. Amen.
 
————
From the Millenial Star.
HIGHLY INTERESTING FROM .
——
We have lately received two lengthy and highly interesting communications from Elder , dated at Trieste, Jan. 1st and 18th, containing a sketch of his voyages and Travels in the East, his visit to , a description of ancient Zion, the pool of Siloam, and many other places famous in holy writ, with several illustrations of the manners and customs of the East, as applicable to Scripture texts, and several conversations held between himself and some of the Jews, Missionaries, &c. in , together with a masterly description of a terrible tempest and thunder storm at sea, with a variety of miscellaneous reflections and remarks, all written in an easy, elegant and masterly style, partaking of the eloquent and sublime, and breathing a tone of that deep feeling, tenderderness, and affection so characteristic of his mission and the spirit of his holy and sacred office.
has by the grace of God been the first proclaimer of the fulness of the Gospel both on the continent of Europe and in far-off Asia, among the nations of the East. In Germany, Turkey and (Constantinople), Egypt and , he has reared as it were the ensign of the latter-day glory and sounded the trump of truth, calling upon the people of those regions to awake from their thousand years’ slumber, and to make ready for their returning Lord.
In his travels he has suffered much, and has been exposed to toils and dangers, to hunger, pestilence and war. He has been in perils by land and sea, in perils among robbers, in perils among Heathens, Turks, Arabs and Egyptians; but out of all these things the Lord hath deliv[er]ed him, and hath restored him in safety to the shores of Europe, where he is tarrying for a little season, for the purpose of publishing the Truth in the German language, having already published it in French and English in the various countries of the East, and we humbly trust that his labors will be a lasting blessing to Jew and Gentile.
We publish the following extract of his communication, and we shall soon issue the whole from the press in pamphlet form. It will not doubt meet with a ready sale; and we purpose devoting the profits to his benefit, to assist him in his mission.
“Summoning up, therefore, what little address I had, I procured a valet d’place, or lackey, and proceeded to the house of Mr. Simmons, a very respectable Jew, who with some of his family had lately been converted and joined the English Church. I entered their dwelling. They had just sat down to enjoy a dish of coffee, but immediately arose from the table to meet me. I spoke to them in German and asked them if they spoke in English: they immediately replied “Yes,” which was a very agreeable sound to my ear. They asked me in German if I spoke English; I replied, ‘Ya mein Herr.’ I then introduced myself to them, and with a little apology it passed off as well as though I had been introduced by the Pacha. With that glow of warmth and familiarity which is a peculiar trait in the German character, they would have me set down and take a dish with them; and as I began to relate some things relative to my mission, the smiles of joy which sat upon their countenance bespoke hearts not altogether indifferent. There were two ministers of the Church of England there. One was confined to his bed by sickness the other a German, and a Jew by birth, soon came in. After an introduction, I took the liberty to lay open to him some of our principles and gave him a copy of the communication to the Jews of Constantinople to read. After he had read it, he said that my motives were undoubtedly very good, but questioned the propriety of my undertaking from the fact that I claimed God had sent me. If indeed I had gone to under the direction of some missionary board or society, and left God out of the question altogether, I should have been received as a celestial messenger. How truly did our Saviour speak, when he said, ‘I am come in my father’s name, and yet receive me not; but if another were to come in his own name, him ye would receive.’ I replied, however, that so far as I could know my own heart, my motives were most certainly good; yet, said I no better than the cause which has brought me here. But he like all others who worship a God ‘without body or parts,’ said that miracles, visions, and prophecy had ceased.
“The course which the popular clergy pursue at this time in relation to the Divine economy looks to me as though they would say ‘O Lord, we will worship thee with all our hearts serve thee with all our souls and be very pious and holy, we will even gather Israel, convert the heathen, and bring in the millennium, if you will only let us alone that we may do it in our own way, and according to our own will, but if you speak from Heaven to interfere with our plan, or cause any to see visions or dreams, or prophesy, whereby we are disturbed or interrupted in our worship, we will exert all our strength and skill to deny what you say, and charge it home upon the devil or some wild fanatic spirit as being its author.”
“That which was looked upon by the ancient Saints as among the greatest favours and blessings, viz; revelation from God and communion with him by dreams and by visons, is now looked upon by the religious world as the height of presumption and folly. The ancient saints considered their condition most deplora [p. 804]
they will come, they may, and partake of the waters of life freely.
16. Behold this is my doctrine: whosoever repenteth and cometh unto me, the same is my church, whosoever declareth more or less than this, the same is not of me, but is against me: therefore he is not of my church.
17. And now, behold, whosoever is of my church, and endureth of my church to the end, him will I estabish upon my Rock, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against them.
18. And now, remember the words of him who is the life and the light of the world, your Redeemer, your Lord, and your God. Amen.
 
————
From the Millenial Star.
HIGHLY INTERESTING FROM .
——
We have lately received two lengthy and highly interesting communications from Elder , dated at Trieste, Jan. 1st and 18th, containing a sketch of his voyages and Travels in the East, his visit to , a description of ancient Zion, the pool of Siloam, and many other places famous in holy writ, with several illustrations of the manners and customs of the East, as applicable to Scripture texts, and several conversations held between himself and some of the Jews, Missionaries, &c. in , together with a masterly description of a terrible tempest and thunder storm at sea, with a variety of miscellaneous reflections and remarks, all written in an easy, elegant and masterly style, partaking of the eloquent and sublime, and breathing a tone of that deep feeling, tenderderness, and affection so characteristic of his mission and the spirit of his holy and sacred office.
has by the grace of God been the first proclaimer of the fulness of the Gospel both on the continent of Europe and in far-off Asia, among the nations of the East. In Germany, Turkey and (Constantinople), Egypt and , he has reared as it were the ensign of the latter-day glory and sounded the trump of truth, calling upon the people of those regions to awake from their thousand years’ slumber, and to make ready for their returning Lord.
In his travels he has suffered much, and has been exposed to toils and dangers, to hunger, pestilence and war. He has been in perils by land and sea, in perils among robbers, in perils among Heathens, Turks, Arabs and Egyptians; but out of all these things the Lord hath delivered him, and hath restored him in safety to the shores of Europe, where he is tarrying for a little season, for the purpose of publishing the Truth in the German language, having already published it in French and English in the various countries of the East, and we humbly trust that his labors will be a lasting blessing to Jew and Gentile.
We publish the following extract of his communication, and we shall soon issue the whole from the press in pamphlet form. It will not doubt meet with a ready sale; and we purpose devoting the profits to his benefit, to assist him in his mission.
“Summoning up, therefore, what little address I had, I procured a valet d’place, or lackey, and proceeded to the house of Mr. Simmons, a very respectable Jew, who with some of his family had lately been converted and joined the English Church. I entered their dwelling. They had just sat down to enjoy a dish of coffee, but immediately arose from the table to meet me. I spoke to them in German and asked them if they spoke in English: they immediately replied “Yes,” which was a very agreeable sound to my ear. They asked me in German if I spoke English; I replied, ‘Ya mein Herr.’ I then introduced myself to them, and with a little apology it passed off as well as though I had been introduced by the Pacha. With that glow of warmth and familiarity which is a peculiar trait in the German character, they would have me set down and take a dish with them; and as I began to relate some things relative to my mission, the smiles of joy which sat upon their countenance bespoke hearts not altogether indifferent. There were two ministers of the Church of England there. One was confined to his bed by sickness the other a German, and a Jew by birth, soon came in. After an introduction, I took the liberty to lay open to him some of our principles and gave him a copy of the communication to the Jews of Constantinople to read. After he had read it, he said that my motives were undoubtedly very good, but questioned the propriety of my undertaking from the fact that I claimed God had sent me. If indeed I had gone to under the direction of some missionary board or society, and left God out of the question altogether, I should have been received as a celestial messenger. How truly did our Saviour speak, when he said, ‘I am come in my father’s name, and yet receive me not; but if another were to come in his own name, him ye would receive.’ I replied, however, that so far as I could know my own heart, my motives were most certainly good; yet, said I no better than the cause which has brought me here. But he like all others who worship a God ‘without body or parts,’ said that miracles, visions, and prophecy had ceased.
“The course which the popular clergy pursue at this time in relation to the Divine economy looks to me as though they would say ‘O Lord, we will worship thee with all our hearts serve thee with all our souls and be very pious and holy, we will even gather Israel, convert the heathen, and bring in the millennium, if you will only let us alone that we may do it in our own way, and according to our own will, but if you speak from Heaven to interfere with our plan, or cause any to see visions or dreams, or prophesy, whereby we are disturbed or interrupted in our worship, we will exert all our strength and skill to deny what you say, and charge it home upon the devil or some wild fanatic spirit as being its author.”
“That which was looked upon by the ancient Saints as among the greatest favours and blessings, viz; revelation from God and communion with him by dreams and by visons, is now looked upon by the religious world as the height of presumption and folly. The ancient saints considered their condition most deplora [p. 804]
Page 804