Times and Seasons, 15 April 1842

  • Source Note
Page 755
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all the former, does horribly surpass them; as well respecting its sharpness as its stings! I write you this laying upon my bed, because my body is affected not less than my soul, at the report that you was about to do something which I had not expected from you. I fainted, my nerves and feelings sunk, and only by the help of a physician for whom I sent immediately, I am able to write these lines to you with a trembling hand. Alas! you, my son, whom I have bred, nourished and fostered; whom I have strengthened spiritually as well as bodily, you will commit a crime on me! Do not shed the innocent blood of your parents, for no harm have we inflicted upon you; we are not conscious of any guilt against you; but at all times we thought it our duty to shew to you, our first born, all love and goodness. I thought I should have some cheering account of you, but alas! how terribly have I been disappointed! But to be short, your outward circumstances are such that you may finish your study or pain.
Do you think that the Christians to whom you will go over by changing your religion will support you, and fill up the place of our fellow believers? Do not imagine that; your outward reasons therefore if you have any are nothing. But out of true persuasion you will, as I think, not change our true and holy doctrine, for that deceitful, untrue and perverse doctrine of Christianity. What! will you give up a pearl for that which is nothing—which is of no value in itself? But you are light minded; think of the last judgment,—of that day when the books will be opened and hidden things will be made manifest; of that day when death will approach you in a narrow pass, when you cannot go out of the way! Think of your death bed from which you will not rise any more, but from which you will be called before the judgment seat of the Lord! Do you not know, have you not heard, that there is over you an all hearing ear, and an all seeing eye? that all your deeds will be written in a book and judged hereafter? Who shall then assist you when the Lord will ask you with a thundering voice, why hast thou forsaken that holy law which shall have an eternal value; which was given by my servant Moses and no man shall change it? Why hast thou forsaken that law and accepted instead of it lying and vanity? Come therefore again to yourself, my son! remove your bad and wicked councellors; follow my advise and the Lord will be with you! Your tender father must conclude because of weeping.
Signed,
A. L. LANDAU,
Rabbi.
-[Jewish Intelligencer.
 
————
From the Millennial Star.
’ LETTER.
. Dec. 14, 1841
,
Beloved Brother in Christ,—Having finished my labors in the regions of Bedford and Birmingham, I arrived in on the 28th of October, on my way to my family in .
I found on my arrival that large placards were posted through the town that I would preach on the following Sabbath in the Music Hall, and in the evening give my reasons for renouncing the doctrines of Methodism and embracing the doctrines and principles of the Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints. When evening came the people were quite in a ferment. The Music Hall was filled to oveflowing, there being more than 2,000 people present. At the close some of the good christains (so called) began to disturb the meeting. I arose and told them we had taken that place to worship God in, but if any of them thought he could prove our doctrine false, he should have an opportuninty in fair open discussion. After the close of the meeting, a Mr. J. B. Philips, of the Church of England, came forward and desired to discuss the subject. He said he considered himself fully competent to prove our doctrine false.
Arrangements were soon completed. The discussion was to be held in the Queen’s Theatre, the subject being the Book of Mormon and our principles, and to continue three evenings. The Bible was to be the rule of evidence by which all decisions were to be made. Each chose a chairman, and they chose a third as an arbitrator between them.
Mr. Philips nominated Dr. Wetherall, a highly respectable medical gentleman of , belonging to no religious society. This gentleman had never attended our meetings, and was an entire stranger to myself and the saints, and our opponents, in nominating him, said they knew him to be an impartial man, [p. 755]
all the former, does horribly surpass them; as well respecting its sharpness as its stings! I write you this laying upon my bed, because my body is affected not less than my soul, at the report that you was about to do something which I had not expected from you. I fainted, my nerves and feelings sunk, and only by the help of a physician for whom I sent immediately, I am able to write these lines to you with a trembling hand. Alas! you, my son, whom I have bred, nourished and fostered; whom I have strengthened spiritually as well as bodily, you will commit a crime on me! Do not shed the innocent blood of your parents, for no harm have we inflicted upon you; we are not conscious of any guilt against you; but at all times we thought it our duty to shew to you, our first born, all love and goodness. I thought I should have some cheering account of you, but alas! how terribly have I been disappointed! But to be short, your outward circumstances are such that you may finish your study or pain.
Do you think that the Christians to whom you will go over by changing your religion will support you, and fill up the place of our fellow believers? Do not imagine that; your outward reasons therefore if you have any are nothing. But out of true persuasion you will, as I think, not change our true and holy doctrine, for that deceitful, untrue and perverse doctrine of Christianity. What! will you give up a pearl for that which is nothing—which is of no value in itself? But you are light minded; think of the last judgment,—of that day when the books will be opened and hidden things will be made manifest; of that day when death will approach you in a narrow pass, when you cannot go out of the way! Think of your death bed from which you will not rise any more, but from which you will be called before the judgment seat of the Lord! Do you not know, have you not heard, that there is over you an all hearing ear, and an all seeing eye? that all your deeds will be written in a book and judged hereafter? Who shall then assist you when the Lord will ask you with a thundering voice, why hast thou forsaken that holy law which shall have an eternal value; which was given by my servant Moses and no man shall change it? Why hast thou forsaken that law and accepted instead of it lying and vanity? Come therefore again to yourself, my son! remove your bad and wicked councellors; follow my advise and the Lord will be with you! Your tender father must conclude because of weeping.
Signed,
A. L. LANDAU,
Rabbi.
-[Jewish Intelligencer.
 
————
From the Millennial Star.
’ LETTER.
. Dec. 14, 1841
,
Beloved Brother in Christ,—Having finished my labors in the regions of Bedford and Birmingham, I arrived in on the 28th of October, on my way to my family in .
I found on my arrival that large placards were posted through the town that I would preach on the following Sabbath in the Music Hall, and in the evening give my reasons for renouncing the doctrines of Methodism and embracing the doctrines and principles of the Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints. When evening came the people were quite in a ferment. The Music Hall was filled to oveflowing, there being more than 2,000 people present. At the close some of the good christains (so called) began to disturb the meeting. I arose and told them we had taken that place to worship God in, but if any of them thought he could prove our doctrine false, he should have an opportuninty in fair open discussion. After the close of the meeting, a Mr. J. B. Philips, of the Church of England, came forward and desired to discuss the subject. He said he considered himself fully competent to prove our doctrine false.
Arrangements were soon completed. The discussion was to be held in the Queen’s Theatre, the subject being the Book of Mormon and our principles, and to continue three evenings. The Bible was to be the rule of evidence by which all decisions were to be made. Each chose a chairman, and they chose a third as an arbitrator between them.
Mr. Philips nominated Dr. Wetherall, a highly respectable medical gentleman of , belonging to no religious society. This gentleman had never attended our meetings, and was an entire stranger to myself and the saints, and our opponents, in nominating him, said they knew him to be an impartial man, [p. 755]
Page 755