Times and Seasons, 16 May 1842

  • Source Note
Page 787
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LETTER FROM .
, Jan. 29th 1842.
To Pres’t. , Elders , & .
Beloved Brethren,
I have often had a desire to hear from you, and also to write a few lines to you, but have deferred writing untill I could inform you definitely the time when I had reason to expect the privilege of taking my departure from this land would be granted me, and my way made clear, so that I could set my face Zionward.
I and my family purpose, if it be the will of the Lord, to set sail for the land of Zion in September next; and we desire an interest in your prayers to the God of Jacob, that our way may be opened, and our wishes realized. We were glad to hear of the safe arrival of yourselves and the rest of your brethren, and of the prosperity of the work of the Lord in Zion; and we trust that you are now rejoicing with your families, and with the saints of the Most High, in hope of the glory of God. I was sorry that we were prevented leaving England at the time of your return, but was reconciled when I reflected upon the parting words of , “That it was for a wise purpose which we could not then see; but which would be made manifest to us.” Since then circumstances have transpired, which caused me to rejoice that I was disappointed leaving England when I had intended. Soon after your departure a clergyman of the Church of England called upon my employer, to request that he might have an interview with me, as he had a wish to propound certain questions to me; upon his request being complied with, we retired to a private room, when he produced a long list of questions written down, opposite to which he wrote my answers. The rise of the church, priesthood, doctrines, offices, sacraments &c. were the principle queries he advanced. When he demurred to any of our principles I was proceeding to explain, but he cut my discourse short by saying he would not hold any controversy, his object being only to obtain information. After the disposal of his queries he wished to be informed where he could obtain the whole of the publications of the Latter day Saints as he wished to be in possession of them; I informed him at 47 Oxford Street, and he promised to send for them. Soon after the visit of this reverend gentleman, I had reason to suspect that undermining operations were in progress against me, I therefore tendered my resignation to the directors, but they would not accept it, and very soon afterwards a public accountant was employed by them to investigate their accounts for several years back, and I was happy to be enabled to answer satisfactorally every question that was asked of me respecting them.
After this another minister sent a lengthy article extracted from an American paper, purporting to be the production of a Mr. Anthony, with a request that I would “read, mark, learn and inwardly digest the same.” I replied to the statements of Mr. A. and after disposing of them paragraph for paragraph, I told him that I was obliged by his favoring me with it, inasmuch as it satisfied my mind, and was confirmatory of the prediction of Isaiah being fulfilled, seeing that Mr. A. admitted that “the words of the Book were delivered to the learned &c. I then proceeded to contrast the Church of England with the churches established by the Apostles; but he has not acknowledged the receipt of my letter as yet.
The Clergy are building ten new churches in this town and neighborhood, and are employing additional curates to go round to the houses of their parishioners, to coerce or intimidate them into an attendance upon their services, in fulfillment of the words of Paul, “In the last days perilous times will come, &c. that they would have a form of godliness, but deny the power, and would creep into houses to lead captive silly women, &c.” See 2 Timothy, 1st ch. 1 to 8th verses. These curates make repeated visits, generally when the heads of families are from home, and take especial care to enquire where the family are employed, and what place of worship they attend &c. and leave tracts for the family to read.
One of the Rev. Hugh Stowel’s curates has paid several visits to my house, and always in my absense, although he was requested to call when I was at home, and informed the time, when he might meet with me.
The following discourse took place in our own neighborhood. Curate. What religion may you be my good woman? I [p. 787]
LETTER FROM .
, Jan. 29th 1842.
To Pres’t. , Elders , & .
Beloved Brethren,
I have often had a desire to hear from you, and also to write a few lines to you, but have deferred writing untill I could inform you definitely the time when I had reason to expect the privilege of taking my departure from this land would be granted me, and my way made clear, so that I could set my face Zionward.
I and my family purpose, if it be the will of the Lord, to set sail for the land of Zion in September next; and we desire an interest in your prayers to the God of Jacob, that our way may be opened, and our wishes realized. We were glad to hear of the safe arrival of yourselves and the rest of your brethren, and of the prosperity of the work of the Lord in Zion; and we trust that you are now rejoicing with your families, and with the saints of the Most High, in hope of the glory of God. I was sorry that we were prevented leaving England at the time of your return, but was reconciled when I reflected upon the parting words of , “That it was for a wise purpose which we could not then see; but which would be made manifest to us.” Since then circumstances have transpired, which caused me to rejoice that I was disappointed leaving England when I had intended. Soon after your departure a clergyman of the Church of England called upon my employer, to request that he might have an interview with me, as he had a wish to propound certain questions to me; upon his request being complied with, we retired to a private room, when he produced a long list of questions written down, opposite to which he wrote my answers. The rise of the church, priesthood, doctrines, offices, sacraments &c. were the principle queries he advanced. When he demurred to any of our principles I was proceeding to explain, but he cut my discourse short by saying he would not hold any controversy, his object being only to obtain information. After the disposal of his queries he wished to be informed where he could obtain the whole of the publications of the Latter day Saints as he wished to be in possession of them; I informed him at 47 Oxford Street, and he promised to send for them. Soon after the visit of this reverend gentleman, I had reason to suspect that undermining operations were in progress against me, I therefore tendered my resignation to the directors, but they would not accept it, and very soon afterwards a public accountant was employed by them to investigate their accounts for several years back, and I was happy to be enabled to answer satisfactorally every question that was asked of me respecting them.
After this another minister sent a lengthy article extracted from an American paper, purporting to be the production of a Mr. Anthony, with a request that I would “read, mark, learn and inwardly digest the same.” I replied to the statements of Mr. A. and after disposing of them paragraph for paragraph, I told him that I was obliged by his favoring me with it, inasmuch as it satisfied my mind, and was confirmatory of the prediction of Isaiah being fulfilled, seeing that Mr. A. admitted that “the words of the Book were delivered to the learned &c. I then proceeded to contrast the Church of England with the churches established by the Apostles; but he has not acknowledged the receipt of my letter as yet.
The Clergy are building ten new churches in this town and neighborhood, and are employing additional curates to go round to the houses of their parishioners, to coerce or intimidate them into an attendance upon their services, in fulfillment of the words of Paul, “In the last days perilous times will come, &c. that they would have a form of godliness, but deny the power, and would creep into houses to lead captive silly women, &c.” See 2 Timothy, 1st ch. 1 to 8th verses. These curates make repeated visits, generally when the heads of families are from home, and take especial care to enquire where the family are employed, and what place of worship they attend &c. and leave tracts for the family to read.
One of the Rev. Hugh Stowel’s curates has paid several visits to my house, and always in my absense, although he was requested to call when I was at home, and informed the time, when he might meet with me.
The following discourse took place in our own neighborhood. Curate. What religion may you be my good woman? I [p. 787]
Page 787