Times and Seasons, 2 May 1842

  • Source Note
Page 768
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Neither is this all. It is not sufficient that the poor be fed and clothed, the sick ministered unto, the built:—No! when all this is accomplished, there must be a year of Jubilee; there must be a day of rejoicing; there must be a time of release to Zion’s sons, or our offerings, our exertions, our hopes and our prayers will be in vain, and God will not accept of the doings of his people.
On those days of darkness which overspread our horizon; when the wolf was howling for his prey around the streets of ; when the burgler was committing his midnight and midday depredations in : when the heartless politician was thrusting his envious darts in —and when the savage war whoop of , echoed and re-echoed through , and Zion’s noblest sons were chained in dungeons, and her daughters driven by a horde of savages naked and defenceless, from their once peaceful homes to seek a shelter in a far distant land. Many of the brethren stepped forward to their rescue, and not only expended all they possessed for the relief of suffering innocence, but gave their notes and bonds to obtain more means, with which to help those, who could not escape the overwhelming surge of banishment from all that they possessed on earth.
Deaths, wounds, and sickness, from the mob, and the cold and shelterless situation of the brethren, followed in quick succession; and all the means which could possibly be obtained from each other, in addition to the noble charities of the citizens of , were brought in requisition to sustain a remnant of the Saints, who now mostly inhabit this place. To accomplish this the president and bishops loaned money and such things as could be obtained, and gave their obligations in good faith for the payment of the same; and many of the brethren signed with them at different times and in different places to strengthen their hands and help them carry out their designs; fully expecting, that, at some future day, they would be enabled to liquidate all such claims, to the satisfaction of all parties.
Many of these claims have already been settled; many have been given up as cancelled by those who held them, and many yet remain unsettled. The Saints have had many difficulties to encounter since they arrived at this place. In a new country, destitute of houses, food, clothing, and nearly all the necessaries of life, which were rent from them by an unfeeling mob—having to encounter disease and difficulties unnumbered, it is not surprising that the church has not been able to liquidate all such claims, or that many individuals should yet remain involved, from the foregoing circumstances; and while things remain as they are, and men remain subject to the temptations of evil as they now are, the day of release, and year of Jubilee can not be; and we write you especially at this time, brethren, for the purpose of making a final settlement of all such claims, of brother against brother; of the brethren against the presidency and bishops, &c. &c.—claims which have originated out of the difficulties and calamities the church has had to encounter, and which are of long standing, so that when the is completed there will be nothing from this source, to produce jars and discords, strifes and animosities, so as to prevent the blessings of heaven from descending upon us as a people.
To accomplish this most desirable object, we call on all the brethren, who hold such claims, to bring them forward for a final settlement; and also those brethren who have individual claims against each other, of long standing, and the property of the debtor has been wrested from him by violence, or he has been unfortnate, and languished on a bed of sickness till his means are expended; and all claims whatsoever between brother and brother, where there is no reasonable prospect of a just and equitable settlement possible, that they also by some means, either by giving up their obligtions, or destroying them, see that all such old affairs be adjusted so that it shall not give occasion for difficulties to arise hereafter. Yes brethren, bring all such old accounts, notes, bonds &c. and make a consecration of them to the building of the , and if any thing can be obtained on them it will be obtained, and if nothing can be obtained when the is completed, we will make a burnt offering of them, even a peace offering, which shall bind the brethen together in the bonds of eternal peace and love, and union; and joy and salvation shall flow forth into your souls, and you shall rejoice and say it is good that we have harkened unto counsel, and set our brethren free, for God hath blessed us. [p. 768]
Neither is this all. It is not sufficient that the poor be fed and clothed, the sick ministered unto, the built:—No! when all this is accomplished, there must be a year of Jubilee; there must be a day of rejoicing; there must be a time of release to Zion’s sons, or our offerings, our exertions, our hopes and our prayers will be in vain, and God will not accept of the doings of his people.
On those days of darkness which overspread our horizon; when the wolf was howling for his prey around the streets of ; when the burgler was committing his midnight and midday depredations in : when the heartless politician was thrusting his envious darts in —and when the savage war whoop of , echoed and re-echoed through , and Zion’s noblest sons were chained in dungeons, and her daughters driven by a horde of savages naked and defenceless, from their once peaceful homes to seek a shelter in a far distant land. Many of the brethren stepped forward to their rescue, and not only expended all they possessed for the relief of suffering innocence, but gave their notes and bonds to obtain more means, with which to help those, who could not escape the overwhelming surge of banishment from all that they possessed on earth.
Deaths, wounds, and sickness, from the mob, and the cold and shelterless situation of the brethren, followed in quick succession; and all the means which could possibly be obtained from each other, in addition to the noble charities of the citizens of , were brought in requisition to sustain a remnant of the Saints, who now mostly inhabit this place. To accomplish this the president and bishops loaned money and such things as could be obtained, and gave their obligations in good faith for the payment of the same; and many of the brethren signed with them at different times and in different places to strengthen their hands and help them carry out their designs; fully expecting, that, at some future day, they would be enabled to liquidate all such claims, to the satisfaction of all parties.
Many of these claims have already been settled; many have been given up as cancelled by those who held them, and many yet remain unsettled. The Saints have had many difficulties to encounter since they arrived at this place. In a new country, destitute of houses, food, clothing, and nearly all the necessaries of life, which were rent from them by an unfeeling mob—having to encounter disease and difficulties unnumbered, it is not surprising that the church has not been able to liquidate all such claims, or that many individuals should yet remain involved, from the foregoing circumstances; and while things remain as they are, and men remain subject to the temptations of evil as they now are, the day of release, and year of Jubilee can not be; and we write you especially at this time, brethren, for the purpose of making a final settlement of all such claims, of brother against brother; of the brethren against the presidency and bishops, &c. &c.—claims which have originated out of the difficulties and calamities the church has had to encounter, and which are of long standing, so that when the is completed there will be nothing from this source, to produce jars and discords, strifes and animosities, so as to prevent the blessings of heaven from descending upon us as a people.
To accomplish this most desirable object, we call on all the brethren, who hold such claims, to bring them forward for a final settlement; and also those brethren who have individual claims against each other, of long standing, and the property of the debtor has been wrested from him by violence, or he has been unfortnate, and languished on a bed of sickness till his means are expended; and all claims whatsoever between brother and brother, where there is no reasonable prospect of a just and equitable settlement possible, that they also by some means, either by giving up their obligtions, or destroying them, see that all such old affairs be adjusted so that it shall not give occasion for difficulties to arise hereafter. Yes brethren, bring all such old accounts, notes, bonds &c. and make a consecration of them to the building of the , and if any thing can be obtained on them it will be obtained, and if nothing can be obtained when the is completed, we will make a burnt offering of them, even a peace offering, which shall bind the brethen together in the bonds of eternal peace and love, and union; and joy and salvation shall flow forth into your souls, and you shall rejoice and say it is good that we have harkened unto counsel, and set our brethren free, for God hath blessed us. [p. 768]
Page 768