Balance of Account, 23 April 1834

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

Amt. of Balances due from the following persons the 23d. day of apl. 1834 at which time Joseph said it was the will of the Lord the accounts v.s. those persons should be balanced (up to the above date) in full without any value recd.; am’ts as follows
Viz. Balance due from 23d. apl. 1834 was— $584.14
Balance due from Joseph Smith Jr d[itt]o " do was— 1151.31
Balance due from do " do was— 68.57
Balance due from do " do was— 777.98
Balance due from do " do was— 485.67
Balance due from do " do was— 567.68
$3.635.35
[p. [1]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    F. G. Williams & Co. was the branch of the United Firm responsible for church publications in Kirtland. A cash book for the company, begun in October 1833, indicates that Oliver Cowdery, the company's representative, spent approximately $630 during his October 1833 trip to New York to purchase a press and type. The money was “received from N. K. Whitney.” The cash book states that F. G. Williams & Co. made a payment of $166 to N. K. Whitney & Co. in February 1834 and received $10 from N. K. Whitney & Co. in March 1834. This would make a total debt of $474, indicating that there may have been other transactions not recorded in the cash book. (Minutes, 11 Sept. 1833; F. G. Williams & Co., Account Book, 1, 4–5.)  

    F. G. Williams & Co. Account Book, 1833–1835. CHL. In Patience Cowdery, Diary, 1849–1851. CHL. MS 3493.

  2. 2

    There is no clear indication of how JS, Cowdery, Rigdon, and Williams incurred the debts, but they may have been for goods obtained from Newel K. Whitney’s store. The cash book for F. G. Williams & Co. indicates that the firm occasionally provided money to JS, Rigdon, and others when they were traveling, and N. K. Whitney & Co. may have done the same. (F. G. Williams & Co., Account Book, 1, 4, 6.)  

    F. G. Williams & Co. Account Book, 1833–1835. CHL. In Patience Cowdery, Diary, 1849–1851. CHL. MS 3493.

  3. 3

    Johnson’s debts may have been related to a brick tavern on the farm formerly owned by Peter French. Johnson, who was made a member of the firm in June 1833, was instructed by a revelation to manage the tavern and to “take away incumberances” on it. The nature of the encumbrances is unclear, but a Thomas Knight held an existing lease on the tavern when Joseph Coe purchased the farm from French in April 1833. By April 1834, Johnson was trying to secure a tavern license in Chardon, Ohio, indicating that he was preparing it for business. (Revelation, 4 June 1833 [D&C 96:9]; Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 17, pp. 38–39, 359–360, 10 Apr. 1833, microfilm 20,237; Geauga Co., OH, Court of Common Pleas, Court Records, 1807–1904, vol. M, p. 184, 5 Apr. 1834, microfilm 20,277, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  

    U.S. and Canada Record Collection. FHL.