History Draft [1 July–31 December 1842]

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Document Transcript

June 30 1842 (L.L. 168, 9)
1 July 1842 • Friday
<​1​> <​Friday​> July 1. 1842. started for left for New England.
2 July 1842 • Saturday
<​2​> Saturday 2nd. Rode out in the with my clerk, , to look at Some lots,— afterwards rode to s accompanied by & others. For one In to days paper <​“Wasp”​> I find the following. Mr Editor (wasp 46) small. <​I give the foregoing a place in my history for the gratification of the curious, & not for respect to Phrenology.​> For the wasp, To the Citizens of (wasp 46) Joseph Smith.
3 July 1842 • Sunday
<​3​> Sunday 3. This moring I preached at the , to some 8 or 1000 people the subject matter of my discourse was from the Prophet Daniel’s saying that “in the last day, the God of heaven would set up a kingdom” In the PM heard preach at the . “The steamer “Edna” collapsed her flues at the mouth of the , more than 60 persons were badly scladed [scalded].” A proof, among many similar, that the waters of the west are cursed, as saith the <​Lord in a​> revelation.
4 July 1842 • Monday
<​4​> Monday 4. In command of the , “The Legion appeared on parade under command of Brig Gen , ranking officer of the Line. Lieut Gen Smith reviewed the Legion at 11. AM. And. continued in command through the day, which was somewhat unpleasant. Yet an immense number of spectators were present, including the passengers of 3 steamers from the neighboring cities & villages. At the close of the day Gen Smith expressed his entire satisfaction in an animated speech, in which he illustrated the design of the organization of the Legion, viz to yield obedience to the institutions of our count[r]y & protect the Saints from Mobs, after which leave was given for strangers to address the Legion when of expressed his friendly feelings toward , and his satisfaction at gratification at the good discipline of the Legion; <​Mrs & the Ladies of other distinguished officers accompanied their companions on the parade.​>”— A few Lamanites were present, & but little drinking, two individuals were fined $10.25 each for offering whiskey for Sale.
5 July 1842 • Tuesday
<​5​> Tuesday 5. Attended Court Martial, & city council, “An ordinance in <​relation to public shows & Exhibitions” was passed See wasp 56 page​>
6 July 1842 • Wednesday
<​6​> Wedenesday 6. Transacted business in the , and Rode to with . Two keel boats (Wasp 50) Prophets.
7 July 1842 • Thursday
<​7​> Thursday 7. Weather very cool at . Thermometer at 60 degrees
9 July 1842 • Saturday
<​9​> Saturday 9th. I rode on the prairie with bros. & [William] Gheen to look at some land. Dined on my farm, hoed potatoes &c. & in [p. 1] the P.M. returned to the the city & transacted a variety of business. In this days “Wasp” I find the following “Phrenological chart”— of my clerk, Elder , of the Quorum of the 12, by By A. Crane, M. D., “Propensities (wasp 49) &c” Sees <​See​> Explanation see to my chart.—
10 July 1842 • Sunday
<​10​> Sunday Morning 10. Attended meeting at the . preached,— My health is not was not good, At home in the P. M.
11 July 1842 • Monday
<​11​> Monday 11. AM transacting business with Mr. Hunter, PM. at the reading, the papers, & Boght a horse of which I named Jo Duncan.
12 July 1842 • Tuesday
<​12​> Tuesday 12 In At the lodge in consultation, <​about ​> on Ben & Started for & Attended city council. An ordinance was passed regulating auctions.— also provision was made for publishing the s Laws &c. &c.—
Mobs, riots, Earthquakes, tumults, and distress of nations are common. In the manufacturers are reducing the wages of the laborers & turnouts & starvation follow. The Asiatic cholera has appeared again in India.
15 July 1842 • Friday
<​15​> Friday 15. It was reported early in the morning that Elder was missing. I caused the hands & the principle men of the to make search for him. but they found him not. After which a meeting was called at the , & I gave the public a general outline of s conduct. The people met again in the PM. and were addressed on the same subject by, & . I then stated that I had heard that & were engaged with to bring a mob on the city from , & asked , who was present if it was so? To which replied at some length & denied the charge. returned in the evening.— Issued <​an​> Editorial on the Government of God. see Times & Season page 855
16 July 1842 • Saturday
<​16​> Saturday 16. Rode on the prairie with my to show some land to Bro Russel from . Dined with my farmer, Bro , and hoed potatoes. [p. 2]
17 July 1842 • Sunday
<​17​> Sunday 17 Morning 17. Attended meeting at the , was sick and tarried at home the remainder of the day.
18 July 1842 • Monday
<​18​> Monday 18 rode out to Bro Kearn’s, and the .
19 July 1842 • Tuesday
<​19​> Tuesday 19. Rode with Henry Kearns & others to examined some timber lands.
20 July 1842 • Wednesday
<​20​> Wednesday 20. State of Mo.)
County of ) This ( affidavit)
<​“affidavit of the city council (T&S. 869. 70) ”​>
22 July 1842 • Friday
<​22​> Friday 22. A special session of the city council was called at 8 oclock this morning, a the Presiding. when the following petition was written & signed by the memters of the council.
“To his Excellency (city council 95. 6. 7.) .”— This fore noon I attended a general meeting of the citizens at the , , Esq Presiding, & clerk, “when Gen presented the following, Resolved (T&S. 869 The meeting was called to order (T&S. 869 ) some things when The object of the meeting was to correct the public mind relative to false reports <​put​> in circulation by & others, & Gen presented the following “Resolution (T&S. 869) States” which resolution was adopted by the Numerous assembly. The assembly came together in the PM. and about 800 signed the foregoing petition from <​presented by​> the city council.— To . “The Ladies Relief Society” also drew up a petition (T&S 869) thi[n]gs
“State of (T&S. 873. 4) Mormon” See affidavits of & , Times & Seasons page 870 &c, also of certificates of , Henry Marks. & . and then Times & Seasons page 874. &c.
24 July 1842 • Sunday
<​24​> Sunday 24. This AM. at home sick. Attended meeting at the in the P.M. and spoke of ’s having returned with the good news that would not be able to acomplish his designs.
26 July 1842 • Tuesday
<​26​> Tuesday 26. Sick this. morning. Rode to my in the P.M.
27 July 1842 • Wednesday
<​27​> Wednesday 27. attended meeting at the & listened to the Electioneering candidates, & spoke at the close of the meeting.—
July 27, 1842— Dear Sir (LL. 169. 170) ” [p. 3]
30 July 1842 • Saturday
<​30​> Sat[u]rday 30. I wrote Gov Govr. (L. B. 239. 240) Smith
My ’s Nephew, , who had gone out on a preaching mission, wrote us this day from See T&S. 891 &c
31 July 1842 • Sunday
<​31​> Sunday 31. In council (LL. 128) sufferings
The High Priests Quorum met in council & instructed their clerk to publish in the Times & S. that it is the duty of the High Priests to have their names enrolled on the records of the Quorum when they arrive at . The members were required to state whether they had any hardness with the brethern, kept the word of wisdom, had family prayer &c; when they spoke in turn.— [p. 4]
August 1842
<​3​> Wednesday 3. An Earthquake was <​re[c]ently​> felt at in Dumlane Cathedral, near Comrie, Scotland.
1 August 1842 • Monday
<​1​> Monday August 1, 1842 A most disgraceful Riot is reported to have commenced in between the colored & white people. which continued 3 or 4 days.—
3 August 1842 • Wednesday
<​3​> Wednesday 3rd. In the transacting a variety of business in co with Gen & others.
4 August 1842 • Thursday
<​4​> Thursday 4. Learning sword exe[r]cise under with of , and attending to a variety of of business.
5 August 1842 • Friday
<​5​> Friday. 5. engaged in a variety of business and at 6 PM Presided in the city council.
6 August 1842 • Saturday
<​6​> Saturday 6. Passed over the to , Iowa, in co with , <​&​> & others, and witnessed the installation of the <​offices of the​> Rising Sun Lodge of Ancie[n]t York Masons, at , by Gen , Deputy Grand Master of .
7 August 1842 • Sunday
<​7​> Sunday 7. At home through the day.
8 August 1842 • Monday
<​8​> Monday 8th. This AM. I was arrested <​by the Deputy Sheriff of & two assistants,​> on a warrant <​issued by​> from . by the Deputy Sheriff of & two other officers or assistants. <​founded​> on a requisition from of , upon the affidavit of Ex (wasp 66) business.— I have yet to learn escutcheon, I received a letter from the post office, which had been broken open, and I was grieved at the meenness of its contents.
The city council passed the following “ordinance regulating (city council 98 &c)— A disgraceful & bloody mob occurred in at Cincinateie this evening, in and about the “Sans Souci House.”
9 August 1842 • Tuesday
<​9​> Tuesday 9. In co with & , preparing for the return of the Sheriff; prepared a writ of Habeas Corpus from the Master in Chancery.
10 August 1842 • Wednesday
<​10​> Wednesday 10th. The deputy Sheriff returned to but I was absent, and he did not see me <​or .​> He endeavored to alarm my , and the brethrn with his threats if I was not forth coming, but they understood the law in such cases, and his threats proved harmless. [p. 5]
11 August 1842 • Thursday
<​11​> Thursday 11, This AM Bro (L.L. 129. 30) information
12 August 1842 • Friday
<​12​> Friday 12 This AM. (L.L. 133.) river. At ni
This night, & left the & came for & found me in good health & fine Spirits.
13 August 1842 • Saturday
<​13​> Saturday 13th. This AM received a letter from of , (LL 130,1.)
I had sent a request to to come and see me, & she had considered to start in the carriage, but while it was preparing, it attracted the attention of the Sheriff who kept a close watch of all movements. To avoid suspicion, walked to ’s, a waited the arrival of the carriage, in which was & , which which passed off <​down the ​> with & , & raised curtains, receiving , by the way, without any discovery, by the sheriff. When about 4 mi down the the carriage turned on to the prairie, and passing around the , turned into the Timber opposite [Ebenezer] Wiggins farm, where alighted, & walked to , & the carriage returned. I was in good spirits, although somewhat afflicted in body, and was much rejoiced to meet my dear once more
A report (L.L. 131) him.
Great Freshet in , Indian murders in Floridia & Riots in are reported in this day, wasp.—
14 August 1842 • Sunday
<​14​> Sunday 14. Spent the day. (L.L. 131, 2, 3.) Smith
I gave the foregoing letter to . (L L. 133) Probable” but in this Mr Powers was mistaken.
15 August 1842 • Monday
<​15​> Monday 15. This AM. (L.L. 134, 5) interview. See Times & Seasons page 886 &c on persecution, & page 893 for a whirlwind at Chauffailes, & a great fire in Russia
16 August 1842 • Tuesday
<​16​> Tuesday 16. [p. 6]
<​16​> Tuesday 16 wrote a letter to <​as follows​>, Aug 16. 1842 My Dear (L,L, 173. 4. 5.) J. S.
I also wrote as follows, Head Quarters. Aug 16. 1842. . (L L. 170. 1.) Militia.
took the The foregoing letters were delived to who proceeded immediately to the . has taken the greatest interest in my welfare, & I feel to bless him.
Blessed is Bro . (L.L. 135. 164. 165.) God forbid!
<​I design to resume this subject at a future time,​>
returned in the bringing the following letters,
Dear Husband (L. L. 175)
, Ill. 1. o’clock (L. L. 172. 3)
wrote me from as follows. “. Aug 16. 1842 (L.L. 190.1) ,”
“P. S. I know (L,L, 192) J. A. B.”
17 August 1842 • Wednesday
<​17​> Wednesday 17 I went & my I walked out into the woods for exercise, in co with . where we were <​accedentaly​> discovered by a young man. We asked him various questions (L.L. 165.) or no.
(L.L. 171)
Aug 16 <​17th.​> 1842. To his Excellency (LL. 176. 7, 8)
Rumors were afloat (L.L. 165) well treeted.
19 August 1842 • Friday
<​19​> Friday Morning 19. . Presented ’s letter. <​of the 17th.​> to . at , in presence of , (L.L. 178) decided. It appeared evident <​by the conversation​> that was no friend to the Saints, and they could expect no good things from him. He explicitly acknowledged his ignorance of the law touching the case in question.— After spending the day in conversation & reading, I in the evening I received a visit from my Aunt , and at night went to the , and concluded to tarry at home until something further transpired relative to the designs of my persecutors.
20 August 1842 • Saturday
<​20​> Saturday 20. Spent the day in the my general business office, otherwise call, Lodge room or Assembly Room, or council chamber, which is over my , and the place where most of the business of the & church is transacted. My health very indifferent. In the evening had an interview with [p. 7] , & , , & & others, on the illegality of the proceedings of our persecutors.
The High council, in session, decided Resolved that the city of (Record. 7. 8) 4 o’clock.”
The city council instructed the sexton, to report weekly, to the Editor of some Newspaper <​published​> in this , the. names and ages of person deceased, & nature of the disease, or cause of their death. <​which may hereafter bee seen in the “Wasp”​>
was declared unworthy to hold the office of Chanceller of the university, <​& was discharged—​> and was Elected Chanceller of the University of the City of and received the oath of office. was Elected Regent of the University in place of deceased.
21 August 1842 • Sunday
<​21​> Sunday 21. I continued in the assembly room. “This day went to the meeting near the and stated to the congregation that <​he was not upon the . (Star. 139. vol 3 &c T&S 9. 22) for the last time. (L.L. 166).​> his daughter Eliza (L.L. 166.) concerning him &c” <​concerning him &c​> He concluded his remarks <​address ​> (L.L. 167) hands, when almost hand was raised, & no opposite vote when call for.” This meeting was productive of great good, by inspiring the Saints with new zeal and courage, & weakening the hands & hearts of the treacherous, & of evil & designing persons disposed to secret compinations combinations, against the truth. visited in the course of the day & manifested a determination to arouse his energies in defense of the truth.— has also signified his intention of returning to his duties in the church.
22 August 1842 • Monday
<​22​> Tuesday 22nd. I find my feelings of the 16 instant towards my friends revived, and while I contemplate (L.L. 179) deeds. I design to resume this subject again, at a future time. Received an interesting visit from and Aunt . My health & Spirits good. This P.M. received a few lines from , informing me that she should expect me home this evening, believing that she could take better care of (L.L. 181.) . [p. 8]
24 August 1842 • Wednesday
<​24​> Wednesday 24 At home all day. received a visit from from Bros. & .
Aug 24; 1842, Dear Madam (LL. 185) 186
26 August 1842 • Friday
<​26​> Friday 26. At home all day. in at evening in council with some of the 12 and other— (<​L.L.​> 182) public.
Great distress prevails in on account of the dull state of trade—
27 August 1842 • Saturday
<​27​> Saturday 27. in the assembly room with some of the 12 and others who were preparing affidavits for the press.
Aug 27th. 1842, To his Excellancy (L.L. 187. 8) .” See s Letter on account of his daughter <​“Wasp” pospe 19​>
28 August 1842 • Sunday
<​28​> Sunday 28. At home. . Peter Melling , & were received into the High Priests Quorum, at . <​The British Convict Ship Waterloo was wrecked at Cape Town <​during a gale​> & 200 lives lost—​>
29 August 1842 • Monday
<​29​> Monday 29. The special This being the day appointed for the conference referred to on the 26 instant. The Elders (LL. 182.3) Turnout.” near the close of remarks I went upon the . I was rejoiced to look upon the saints once more, whom. I had not seen for about 3 weeks; They also were rejoiced to see me, and we all rejoiced together. My Sudden appearance on the under the circumstances which surrounded us, caused great animation & cheerfulness in the assembly. Some had supposed that I had gone to , & some that I had gone to Europe, while a few <​some​> thought I was in the ; but whatever difference of opinions had prevailed on this point, they <​we​> were now all agreed and were to rejoice together filled with thanksgiving & rejoicing. When had done speaking I arose and congratulated the brethern & sisters on the victory I had once more gained over the Missourians. I had told them (183, 4) them. During the address an indescribable transport of good feeling was manifested by the whole assembly. And about 380 Elders volunteered to go immediately on the proposed mission. [p. 9]
30 August 1842 • Tuesday
<​30​> Tuesday 30. At home through the day.
31 August 1842 • Wednesday
<​31​> Wednesday 31. At home in the A.M.— P.M. rode to the with , and attended the Female Relief Society Meeting.
Some time this month, published a pamphlet of <​in​> the German language in , Entitled “A cry out of the wilderness &c” of about 120 pages setting forth the rise progress & doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
At or about the 31st. of Aug, while I was passing from to in a boat <​in co with ​> we passed through an immense shoal of fish of considerable size. Hundreds jumped in & over the boat. Many jumped out or swam as they struck the boat, but we succeded in securing about 16, which we brought to shore [p. 10]
1 September 1842 • Thursday
<​1​> Thursday Septr. 1. 1842 During the AM. in the assembly Room and in the P.M. at home attending to busing business
I wrote the following, Sept 1, 1842, To all the Saints in (L.L. 189 190 <​T&S. 919​>) Joseph Smith. The Following <​is​> From the Times & Seasons of Sept 1.— “Let none suppose (T&S. 908)
2 September 1842 • Friday
<​2​> Friday 2. Spent the day at home. A report reached the this afternoon that the Sheriff was on his way to with an armed force.
3 September 1842 • Saturday
<​3​> Saturday 3. [15 lines blank] [p. 11[a]]
[verso of page 11[a] blank]
<​3​> Saturday 3.
5 September 1842 • Monday
<​5​> Monday 5th. The members of The Sisters wrote as follows “To his Excellency. (See copy) pray,”
6 September 1842 • Tuesday
<​6​> Tuesday 6. I wrote as follows, Jounying [Journeying] <​Doc & Cov p. 420​> L.L. 196. 7. 8. 9. 200 201.) Letter.
In the even[in]g, & called to see me <​concerning a settlement with .— ​>. Also. Also , & called to counsel concerning their mission, to the branches & people abroad.—
7 September 1842 • Wednesday
<​7​> Wednesday 7. Early this morning I received a visit from Elders [Arza] Adams and of , who brought me Several Letters, one from Dr who, referring to his visit, with Esq, of , says, “He would be pleased to receive a letter of Prest Joseph’s own dictation Signed by his own hand,” which request I was disposed to comply with but deferred it till the next day. wrote as follows, “ Sept 7 (L.L. 201 2. 3) ”— Brothers Adams and called again this P.M. & I related to them many interpositions of divine providence in my favor, &c.—
8 September 1842 • Thursday
<​8​> Thursday 8th. I dictated the following, Sept 8. 1842 (LL. 192. 3. 4, 5, 6.) Smith
9 September 1842 • Friday
<​9​> Friday 9. I received a very interesting visit from . , & , <​10​> Saturday 10 , , & signified their declared their intention to to the city council their intention of absence for 3 months or more and others were appointed to fill their places during their absence. , , & were absent, & their places were filled. The <​object of the​> absence of these brethern was to preach the gospel in different states, & show up the wickedness & falsehood of the apostate . “An Ordinance relative to the returns of writs of Habeas Corpus” was passed by the city council. [p. 11[b]]
10 September 1842 • Saturday
<​10​> Saturday 10th. was the th training of the companies of the , & lest I should be observed by the multitude passing & re-passing, I kept very still. After dark my sent me word a messenger & requested me to return home, as she thought I would be as safe there as anywhere, & I went home safely home, undiscovered.
11 September 1842 • Sunday
<​11​> Sunday 11. I was at home all day. My letter of the 6th. of Septr. was read to the Saints, at the near the .
The High Priests Quorum met, Several had gone on missions, others were preparing to go, but few were present, & the meeting adjourned Sine die.
12 September 1842 • Monday
<​12​> Monday 12. Elders “To the Editors Editor (T&S. 926) 1842”)
I was at home all day (LL.201.) s letter of the 7th. inst—
13 September 1842 • Tuesday
<​13​> Tuesday 13. At home all day. Settled with .
14 September 1842 • Wednesday
<​14​> Wednesday 14 — At home. gave me a deed of one 1/2 his landed property in though it may be a long time before it will be of any benefit to me. Had a consultation with Esq— In the P.M (L.L. 203, 4) ’— men) [p. 12]
15 September 1842 • Thursday
<​15​> Thursday 15 In council with Esqr— , also counseled Uncle , & bro to move immediately to & help build up a city.
16 September 1842 • Friday
<​16​> Friday 16. I was at home with who was painting my likeness.
17 September 1842 • Saturday
<​17​> Saturday 17. (See Law of Lord from day to day to 30th. page 205)
Elder wrote a long letter, showing up the persecutions, & my sufferings in their true colors.—
[3 lines blank]
23 September 1842 • Friday
23d. Col (Legion History) promoted
24 September 1842 • Saturday
<​24.​> Sept 24th. The was called out for general parade. (Legion histoy) Decr.
[2 lines blank]
26 September 1842 • Monday
26. The office of Notary Public <​for the city of ​> was created by the city council & was Elected.— A Seal for the Municipal Court was ordered by the council. [p. 13]
<​Sept 21 <​17th​>, Ship Tyrean <​Sidney​> Sailed from for with 204 <​180​> Saints.​>
<​Medford 25th Sept— 214 "​>
<​Henry 28 " 157 "​>
1 October 1842 • Saturday
<​1​> Saturday 1. This A.M. (LL 205. <​& 6​>) all.
In this days wasp I noticed the following letter from “City of (Wasp 94) .—
2 October 1842 • Sunday
<​2​> Sunday 2d. About, (LL 204 <​206​>) all day.
3 October 1842 • Monday
<​3​> Monday 3rd. , (LL 206) day
4 October 1842 • Tuesday
<​4​> Tuesday, , (LL 206) myself—
5 October 1842 • Wednesday
<​5​> Wedneday 5, My Dear was worse (LL 206) Amen
6 October 1842 • Thursday
<​6​> Thursday 6 (, is (LL 206 <​207​> amen. My health is comfortable
7 October 1842 • Friday
<​7​> Friday 7. (This AM. (LL 207,) spirits.—
This day the Teachers met in and organized into a quorum by, appointing Elisha Everett [Averett] Prest,— James Huntsman & Elijah Everett, counselors Samuel Eggleston clerk,— & 11 Members beside
8 October 1842 • Saturday
<​8​> Sat[u]rday 8
9 October 1842 • Sunday
<​9​> Sunday 9th.
10 October 1842 • Monday
<​10​> Monday 10th. returned to , and found Gaining slowly. My health and spirits are good
11 October 1842 • Tuesday
<​11​> <​Tuesday 11​> From the Times & Seasons, “To the Saints (T&S. 957)
13 October 1842 • Thursday
<​<​13​> The brethren arrived from with a raft of about 90,000 ft of boards & 24,000 cubic feet of timber for the & .—​>
15 October 1842 • Saturday
<​15​> Saturday 15. Bro returned to and informed my friends that I was well.
16 October 1842 • Sunday
<​16​> Sunday 16. I copy the following from the New. York Herald. “The Mormons (T&S. 29. &c) &c.” by this I discovered a spark of liberty yet having over <​burning in​> the land, bosom of the writer May it <​continue to​> burnt burn, & burn, & burn, till it once more fires the whole land with its heavenly influence.
20 October 1842 • Thursday
<​20​> Thursday 20. Early (L.L. 207) [Job] Barnum.
(T.&S. 33 &c) .” <​The following letter of​> is (United States Attorney for the district of ,) shows in a very lucid (T&S. 33) notwithsta[n]ding
21 October 1842 • Friday
<​21​> Friday 21. This evening (L.L. 207) more at present.—
23 October 1842 • Sunday
<​23​> Sunday 23. This day (LL. 207) Much.—
25 October 1842 • Tuesday
<​25​> Tuesday 25. Ship Emerald Sailed from , with 250 Saints for
28 October 1842 • Friday
<​28​> Friday 28, Soon after (LL. 208) Praiseworthy
29 October 1842 • Saturday
<​29​> Saturday 29 (about 10 AM. (LL. 208) departed. <​Dr returned, with his family.—​>
30 October 1842 • Sunday
<​30​> Sunday 30. The Saints (LL. 208) sick &c—
31 October 1842 • Monday
<​31​> Monday 31. (I rode (LL 209) dark.— [p. 14]
1 November 1842 • Tuesday
<​1​> Tuesday November 1, 1842. I rode with to the (L L 209.) children.
2 November 1842 • Wednesday
<​2​> Wednesday 2. Spent this (LL. 209) &c
3 November 1842 • Thursday
<​3​> Thursday 3 Rode (209) .
4 November 1842 • Friday
<​4​> Friday 4. Rode (LL 209.) miss[i]on
5 November 1842 • Saturday
<​5​> Saturday 5 I tarried at home on account of the rain. I received a visit from Some Indians (LL. 209, visit
<​I told the would be frozen over in less than a month, although the weath—​>
6 November 1842 • Sunday
<​6​> Sunday 6. At home all day. P.M. Received a visit from Dr
7 November 1842 • Monday
<​7​> Monday 7. Spent the AM. in council (L.L 210) me
8 November 1842 • Tuesday
<​8​> Tuesday 8. This AM.— (LL 210) appoitmet [appointment].— in the P.M. sat <​officiated​> in court as Mayor at my house
9 November 1842 • Wednesday
<​9​> Wednesday 9th. Paid E[rie] Rhodes $436.93 <​it​> being the amount of 3 notes due for the North west Quarter of S. 9, 6 N 8 W. <​& presided in city council on special business Special <​10​> Thurday meeting to investigate the writ of Habeas Corpus.​>
10–11 November 1842 • Thursday–Friday
<​10​> Thursday & Friday 10 & 11. Presided at adjourned sessions of the city council at my house.
12 November 1842 • Saturday
<​12​> Saturday 12. Presided in the City council.
13 November 1842 • Sunday
<​13​> Sunday 13 I was at home th[r]ough the day.
“Ship Sidney (M.S. 160)
14 November 1842 • Monday
<​14​> Monday 14 Presided in city council when was passed “An ordinance regulating the proceeds of Habeas Corpus.” <​See council records.​> Many other bills were discussed on this & previous days.
15 November 1842 • Tuesday
<​15​> Tuesday 15. About home. Wrote for the Times & Seasons the following Validictory (T&S. 8) Smith. proceeded immediately to this his duties as Editor. The papers report a Terrible storm on the Island of Madeira. It commenced raining on the 15 & continued to
16 November 1842 • Wednesday
<​16​> Wednesday 16 About home. In the Evening started a journey to the counties north in company with .
17 November 1842 • Thursday
<​17​> Thursday 17. There was a severe snow Storm and two men were frozen to death on the prairie between & . The was frozen over.
21 November 1842 • Monday
<​21​> Monday 21. “A council of the Twelve viz, , , , , & assembled at the house of , in [p. 15] <​21​> and decided by unanimous acclamation, that the printing of the Millennial Star, and all other publications in , relating to the church of Jesus christ of Latter Day Saints be suspended on the return of Elder , from that country, until further instructions from the Quorum; and that the foregoing minutes be forwarded to , or the Editor of the “Star” which was done by letter from the president & clerk of the council.
22 November 1842 • Tuesday
<​22​> Tuesday 22. I arrived at home, after a pleasant out, in good health & spirits,
23 November 1842 • Wednesday
<​23​> Wednesday 23 At home all day,
24 November 1842 • Thursday
<​24​> Thursday 24 As by report of the papers, the island of Madeira was visited by a dreadful storm, The Summer was hot & weather fine till the 15 when the rain commenced falling heavily. & continued till to the 24, at 1 o clock PM the water fell in torrents, the sky became dark, the streets in the capital became inundated, & the affrighted inhabitants in town and country fled in every direction to the Mountains. Upwards of 200 houses were destroyed <​at Funchal​>, and much corn & wine, The damage to lives, houses & crops on the Island, & boats in the harbors was incalculable.
26 November 1842 • Saturday
<​26​> Saturday 26. At home most of the day, <​at home in the morning, at 10 AM. in city council which resolved that the inscription for the seal (city council RB) charter​> Wrote Esqer, (L. B. 241 &c.) J. S.
In the P.M. went to see President in co with . he was suddenly & sevely attacked with disease with strong symptoms of apoplexy, which was followed immediately with laying on of hands & prayer— accompanied with the use of herbs.— profane vomiting and purging followed, which were favorable indications, although few so violently attacked, ever survive long. Yet the brethern were united in faith & we had firm hopes of his recovery.
27 November 1842 • Sunday
<​27​> Sunday 27. At home, except visiting , who remained extremely sick.
28 November 1842 • Monday
<​28​> Monday 28. at home (LL. 210 &c) P.M.
29 November 1842 • Tuesday
<​29​> Tuesday 29 In council (LL 211) court
30 November 1842 • Wednesday
<​30​> Monday 30 A M (LL111) nonsuited
a severe storm of snow rain & wind is reported to have been experienced at this day & evening, doing much damage to the ships & wharves [p. 16]
1 December 1842 • Thursday
<​1​>
<​1​> Thursday Decemr. 1. 1842. was sick which occupied some of my time. Visited (LL 211) history.
Extract of a letter from , superscribed , dated December 1, 1842, whither he had gone to escape the hands of those who sought his life in . “Dear Bro Joseph <​Smith​> (Letter) part. write Answer this as soon as received Yours Truly, S[ybella McMinn] Armstrong for .
2 December 1842 • Friday
<​2​> Friday 2d Sat as mayor (LL 211.) years
3 December 1842 • Saturday
<​3​> Saturday 3 called at (LL 211) &c.
4 December 1842 • Sunday
<​4​> Sunday 4 (The weather (LL 211.) day
The High council of met, heard and accepted & adopted the report of their committee, for dividing the into ten wards for, transacting church business as follows. The first ward (council mintes page 17)
5 December 1842 • Monday
<​5​> Monday 5 In the AM. in with & others on Bankruptcy, making & an inventory of our Property, & a schedule of our liabilities. That we might be prepared to avail ourselves of the laws of the land; as did others, PM (LL 212) Lodge Masonic Lodge
6 December 1842 • Tuesday
<​6​> Tuesday 6 attended the trial of an appealed case of before the municipal court,—
7 December 1842 • Wednesday
<​7​> Wednesday 7, Dined with (LL. 212) wood,
8 December 1842 • Thursday
<​8​> Thursday 8 Spent the day at home, received a visit from & ,— This day , Gov of presented his in his Inaugural Address to the Senate & Hou[s]e of Representatives, remarked that “a great deal (Wasp 124) citizens
9 December 1842 • Friday
<​9​> Friday 9. I chopped wood. My started for to attend to his case of bankruptcy, with Benjamin Covey as witness , , , & , accompanied them to attend to my case, <​* present testimony to , the Government that I was in at the time was shot consequently could not have been a fugitive from the Justice of .— ​> <​and thus procure a discharge from — on s writ for my arrest.​> The weather was cold, and the travelling tedious yet my messengers travelled 34 miles & staid with my Bro who kept a public house at . [p. 17]
<​9​> In the house of Represen Mr Davis of Bond Co— introduced a resolution <​to the House of Representatives at ​> concerning the charter of , & urged its repeal, in a Mr Hicks was in favor of “having the state arms taken from the mormons.” thought “they had no more than their quota.” -[The arms referred to consisted of 3 cannon <​or​> 6 pounders, & a few score of muskets, swords, & pistols, which were furnished by the to , for the supply of her militia for common defense, of which, the had received but a small portion to which it was Entitled]-
My Brothe[r] , Representative of <​colleague​> with made the following speech <​in the House​> in reply to Mr Owen Davis, Mr Speaker (Wasp 145) fathers.—
10 December 1842 • Saturday
<​10​> Saturday 10. In todays this days paper, gave his valedictory resigning the Editorship of the Wasp to Mr .
13 December 1842 • Tuesday
<​13​> Tuesday 13,— I continued to chop & haul wood & attend to my domestic concerns, and my delegation arrived at about 3 <​oclock​> this P.M. & found the repeal of the Charter in a high state of agitation, in the Legislature.
14 December 1842 • Wednesday
<​14​> Wednesday 14 at 4 P.M. My delegation to having made affidavit that I was in on the 6 of May last, & consequently could not have been concerned in the attempted assassination of , & also having prepared a petition to to revoke the writ of , & proclamation of for my arrest.— called on <​at 4 P.M.​> by their own selection, viz , & , in co with , US District attorney, who read his communication to Elder , Esqr. of the 20th of Octr; my petition to revoke & countermand s writ, & proclamation; & the affidavit of . replied in reply (LL. 213) charters in the state.
15 December 1842 • Thursday
<​15​> T[h]ursday 15. My delegates at continued to prosecute my D one the 16th. the brethern where into arraingment received his discharge in case of Bankruptcy. & every arrangement was made with whereby I was equally entitled to a discharge but was put off with a plea that he must write to <​the office at​> before it could be granted.
17 December 1842 • Saturday
<​17​> Saturday 17 <​Saturday 17​>,— “ (s Letter) .” “ (s Letter) ” “City of ( Letter) ” [p. 18]
<​17​> On receiving the foregoing letters <​and having entered <​for the copy Right of​> a map of the city of . for Joseph Smith, <​in the clerks office of the, <​District of ,​>​>​> the brethern left for ,
20 December 1842 • Tuesday
<​20​> Tuesday 20th. Chopping & drawing wood, with my own hands & team just as I had done mostly since the 9th. continued very sick. This PM. the brethern arrived from , & presented me with Messrs ’s, ’s, & letters and general history of their proceedings, which was highly satisfactory. Elder died this morning at a <​quarter past 3 oclock at Bradford, England. he is the first Elder who has fallen in foreign land in these last days. He had been (M.S. 159) day.​>
21 December 1842 • Wednesday
<​21​> Wednesday 21. At home transacting a variety of business, gave instructions about a letter to Gen & made a special request of <​I appointed​> that he should devote his time <​wholly​> to my employ, to which he consented. & appointed him my private secretary & Historian. & he immediately entered on the duties of his Calling. Elder , had previously been appointed Temple Recorder, and continued to be my general business clerk in my temporal business as he had been since went East in the summer. He is a faithful Man <​see margin *​> <​and called on me with the Temple Committee for some advice, concerning their laying by provisions.— stone cutting &c after listening to their complaints business I wrote the following, (“ Dec 21, 1842 To the hands in the stone shop (s Journal, page 27 &c) church”​>
22 December 1842 • Thursday
<​22​> Thursday 22. I was about home; Read correspondence between & Gen . & Read German with Elder . Bro [Daniel] Shearer inquired the meaning of the “little leaven <​which a woman​> hid in 3 Measures of Meal.” I replied, it alluded expressly to the last days when there should be <​but​> little faith on the earth and it should leaven the whole world; also, there shall be safety in Zion & Jerusalem, & in the Remnants whom the Lord our god shall call. The 3 measures refer directly to the Priesthood; truth springing up on a fixed principle, to the 3 in the grand presidency, confining the oracles to a certain head on the principle of 3.
23 December 1842 • Friday
<​23​> <​Friday 23​> Wrote. Esqr. , that I would accept the proposals of John C. Walsh, & give him $2500 for the N. W. Qr of Sec 8, 6 N. 8 W. <​said land​> lying between my & the .
24 December 1842 • Saturday
<​24​> Saturday 24th. At home P.M. Read & reviewed my history with , & walked with him to see Sister [Sylvia Sessions] Lyon who was sick, her babe died a few minutes before our arrival. From there we went to Bro Sabins to get <​complet expense​> money for our journey to having just borrowed $100 for that purpose. while there [p. 19] <​24​> Sister Sabin <​​> asked if I wanted a wicked man to pray for me? I replied yes, if the fervent effectiate prayer of the rightous availeth much, a wicked man may avail a little when praying for a rightous man. There is more good but one. The better a man is the more his prayer will prevail, like the publican & the Pharisee; one was justified rather than the other showing that both were justified in a degree. The prayer of a wicked man may do a rightous man good, when it does the one who prays no good.
25 December 1842 • Sunday
<​25​> Sunday 25 <​I wrote to Orrin Wright Junr. .—​> The <​(Eng)​> conference met this day numbering 1506 members, including 33 Elders 87 P. 53 T. & 19 Deacons, under the presidency of Elder Thomas Ward.
26 December 1842 • Monday
<​26​> Monday 26. <​In the morning held court, &​> I was <​afterwards​> arrested by Gen , on the proclamation of , & Elders & went to to obtain a writ of Habeus Corpus to take me before the court at . gave me in custody of ,— with whom I visited , who was severely afflicted. We prescribed Lobelia for her, among other things, which is excellent in its place. I have learned the value of it by my own experience. It is one of the works of god, but like the power of god or any other good, it becomes an evil when improperly used. gave me a walking stick, the body of which was from the tooth of the sperm whale, & the top of whale ivory, with an interstice of Mahogany. On my return home I found my wife sick. She was delivered of a son, which did not survive its birth.
The Herefordshire conference (Eng) under the presidency of El. Wm. Kay, met at Caldwell, numbering 844 members, including 20 El. 53 P. 22 T. & 10 Deacons.
27 December 1842 • Tuesday
<​27​> Tuesday 27th. At 9 A.M. started in custody of gen for , in co with , , , , , , <​&​> ; on our way to we met , , & , who had obtained an order for a writ of Habeas corpus, But no writ could be, There from the master in Chancery as no writ could issue, on account of the absence of the clerk for the the clerk of court having been elected to the senate. There was considerable snow and the travelling heavy but we arrived at my my brother , in a little after sunset, & were soon joined by , , Dr Tate & . [p. 20]
<​27​> I supped with Bro s family, who lived under the same roof, slept with on a Buffalo skin spread upon the floor, and dreamed that I was by a beautiful steam of water and saw a noble fish which I thew out, soon after I saw a number more, & threw them out. I afterwards saw a multitude of fish, & threw out a great abundance, & sent for salt & salted them.
28 December 1842 • Wednesday
<​28​> Wednesday 28th. The morning was wet, we started about 8 oclock, taking and arrived a Mrs Stevenson’s tavern in at 3 P.M. about 20 miles. wife, who was sick went with us, accompanied by , who went with us from to take care of her. I spent a part of the evening with Mr , & family, <​& a part of my company.​> In conversation respecting the repeal of charters. I told them that to touch the Nauvoo charter was no better than highway Robbery, that since the creation there never had been a repeal of a perpetual charter by god, angels, or men; & that I never would submit to lowering our charter, but they might bring other charters up to it. On my return to the tavern the brethern took my height which was 6 feet, & my the same.
29 December 1842 • Thursday
<​29​> Thursday 29. Started early, crossed the at 11, & arrived at before 5 P.M. about 32 miles, the weather extremely cold.— asked why the sun was called masculine & the moon feminine? I replied that the root of masculine is stronger, & of feminine weaker. The sun is a governing planet to certain planets, while the moon borrows her light from the sun & is less or weaker &c. Let the government of redress the wrongs she has done to the saints, or let the curse follow them from generation to generation until they do. When I was going up to . in co with & our families, on an extreme cold day, To go forward was 14 mis to a house, and backward nearly as far. We applied to all the taverns for admission in vain, we were Mormon & could not be received. Such was the extreme cold that in 1 hour we must have perished. We plead for our women & children in vain. We counseled together and the brethern agreed to stand by me, & we concluded we might as well die fighting, as freeze to death. I went into a tavern & plead our cause to get admission. The Landlord said he could not keep us for love or money. I told him [p. 21] we must & would stay let the consequence be what it might for we must stay or perish. The Landlord replied, “we have heard the mormons are very bad people, & the inhabitants of Paris have combined not to have any thing to do with them or you might stay.” I told <​said to​> him we would will stay, but no thanks to you him; I have men enough to take the town, & if we must freeze, we will freeze by the burning of these houses. The taverns were then opened & we were accommodated & received many apologies in the morning, from the inhabitants for their abusive treatment.
30 December 1842 • Friday
<​30​> Friday 30. Started at 8 this morning & arrived at in , 2½ P.M. where I saw Esqr. district attorney, who told me that had continued the court 2 or 3 days on account of my case, & would close on the morrow, and that he should try my case on its merits & not on any technicality. of was in the place, but would not say whether he had the original writ <​The original writ which had previously been demanded of the officers of , & .​> I gave a general history of my persecutions, and it was agreed by him that I should be brought up arrested on the writ. Had an interview with Bro , who was a member of the Legislature at the time, and spent the eving with & the brthrn from . <​we all lodged at .​> Christ and the resurrected saints will reign over the earth, during the 1000 years, but will not dwell on the Earth. They will visit it when they please, or when it is necessary to govern it. There will be wicked men on the earth during the 1000 years. The heathen nations who will not come up to worship will be destroyed.
Salt, vinegar & pepper, given internally, and plunging in the river when the peroxisms begin, will cure the cholera.
31 December 1842 • Saturday
<​31​> Saturday 31. at 9 A.M. called & informed me that had the original writ, & I signed a petition to to issue a new writ, that my case might be tried theron as well as <​on​> the proclamation. My petition was granted, & at 11 oclock I was arrested theron, by a deputy, Mr Maxey, in presence of , my attorney, who immediately wrote a petition to for a writ of Habeas corpus, which I signed, 1/2 past 11 oclock & at 11½ A.M. went before . when read my petition, & stated that the writ & warrant, were different from the requisition of the of He then read s warrant, ’s affidavit, requisition on the of , & the proclamation of , showing that had made a false statement, as nothing appeared in the affidavit to show that Smith was in He also stated that all the authority for transportation of persons from one state to another [p. 22] <​31—​> rests on the constitution and the law of Congress. We ask for Habeas corpus because the papers are false, & because we can prove that Joseph Smith was in this state at the time of the commission of the crime. The writ was granted, returned, & served in one minute, & I walked up to the bar. read the Habeas Corpus, & moved the court to take bail till I could have a hearing, which was granted: and although it was only a case of misdemeaner Genr. & were bailed for me in the sum of $2000 each, & Monday was set for trial. The court room was crowded, and on our retiring as came to the top of the stairs, some one of the crowd observed “there goes Smith the prophet, & a good looking man he is” “and (said another) as damed dam’d a rascal as ever lived.” replied “and a good many Ditto.” “Yes (said the man) ditto, ditto, God dam you; and every one that takes his part is as dam’d a rascal as he is.” When at the foot of the stairs, said “I am the man, & I take his part.” Said the man “you are a dam’d rascal <​to.​>” “You are a lying scoundrel” replied & the man began to strip off his clothes, & ran out in the street cursing & swearing, & raising a tumult, when Mr [Lyman] Prentice, the marshall, interfered & with great exertions quelled the riotous proceedings, mob. Much credit is due Mr Prentice for his zeal to keep the peace. When the rowdies had dispersed I went with <​& ​> to see who was sick. He told me he had a requisition from the of for a renewal of persecution in the old case of treason against but he happened to know that the it was all dead. We dined with at the “American House,” where the quartered, after which we returned to the s. room. In course of conversation he remarked “he was no religionist” I replied <​told him​> I had no creed to circumscribe my mind, therefor the people did not like me. “Well (said the ) from reports we had reason to think the mormons were a peculiar people, different from other people, having horns or something of the kind; but I find they look like other people, indeed I think Mr Smith is a very good looking man. At 2 P.M I returned to & appointed Elders & to preach in the Representatives Hall on the Sabbath morrow. stated that it was possible to revoke political charters, but not co charters. I argued that if a Legislature has power to grant a charter for 10 years it has no power to revoke it until after the expiration thereof. The same principle will hold good for 20 or 100 years, & also for a perpetual charter it cannot be revoked in time. [p. 23]
John Darby came in & said he was going to with [James] Brewster. I told him I would say to him as the prophet said to Hezikiah “go & prosper, but ye shall not return in peace.” Brewster may set out for but he will not get there unless somebody shall pick him up by the way, feed him, & help him along. Brewster showed me the manuscript he had been writing. I inquired of the Lord & the Lord told me it <​the book​> was not true, it was not of him. If God ever called me, or spake by my mouth, or gave me a revelation, he never gave revelations to that Brewster boy, or any of the Brewster race.
This afternoon, a team ran away, & went past the State house, when the hue & cry was raised “Jo Smith is running away”, which produced great excitement & a sudden adjournment of the House of Representatives.
[10 lines blank]
28 September 1842 • Wednesday
Note “Sept 28, 1842,— Resolved that William Seichrist be excluded from the fellowship of this church [the first regular Baptist] church, (of the city of Alleghany, Alleghany County, Pennsylvania) for embracing (T&S. vol 4. 26) clerk. Deacon John Beck was moderator of the meeting.” [p. 24]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    See 1 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1352.  

  2. 2

    See 2 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, pp. 1352–1354.  

  3. 3

    See 3 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1354.  

  4. 4

    See 4 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, pp. 1354–1355.  

  5. 5

    See 5 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1355.  

  6. 6

    See 6 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1355.  

  7. 7

    See 7 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1355.  

  8. 8

    See 9 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, pp. 1355–1356.  

  9. 9

    See 10 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1356.  

  10. 10

    See 11 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1356.  

  11. 11

    See 12 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1356.  

  12. 12

    See 15 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1356.  

  13. 13

    See 16 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1356.  

  14. 14

    See 17 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1357.  

  15. 15

    See 18 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1357.  

  16. 16

    See 19 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1357.  

  17. 17

    See 20 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1357.  

  18. 18

    See 22 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, pp. 1357–1360.  

  19. 19

    See 24 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1360.  

  20. 20

    See 26 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1360.  

  21. 21

    See 27 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, pp. 1360–1361.  

  22. 22

    See 30 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1361.  

  23. 23

    See 31 July 1842 entry in JS History, vol. C-1, p. 1361.  

  24. 24

    See Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  25. 25

    See 1 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  26. 26

    See 3 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  27. 27

    See 4 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  28. 28

    See 5 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  29. 29

    See 6 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1362.  

  30. 30

    See 7 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1363.  

  31. 31

    See 8 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1363–1364.  

  32. 32

    See 9 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1364.  

  33. 33

    See 10 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1364.  

  34. 34

    See 11 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1364–1365.  

  35. 35

    See 12 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1365.  

  36. 36

    See 13 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1365–1366.  

  37. 37

    See 14 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1366–1368.  

  38. 38

    See 15 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1368–1369.  

  39. 39

    See 16 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1369–1376.  

  40. 40

    See 17 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1376–1378.  

  41. 41

    See 19 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1378–1379.  

  42. 42

    See 20 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1379–1380.  

  43. 43

    See 21 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1380–1381.  

  44. 44

    See 22 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1381–1384.  

  45. 45

    See 24 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1384–1385.  

  46. 46

    See 26 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1385.  

  47. 47

    See 27 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1385–1387.  

  48. 48

    See 28 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1387.  

  49. 49

    See 29 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1387–1389.  

  50. 50

    See 30 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1389.  

  51. 51

    See 31 Aug. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1389.  

  52. 52

    See 1 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1389–1391.  

  53. 53

    See 2 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1391.  

  54. 54

    See 3 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, Addenda p. 1.  

  55. 55

    TEXT: First of two pages numbered “11”.  

  56. 56

    See 5 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1391–1392.  

  57. 57

    See 6 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1392–1396.  

  58. 58

    See 7 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1396–1398.  

  59. 59

    See 8 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1398–1401.  

  60. 60

    See 9 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1401.  

  61. 61

    TEXT: Second of two pages numbered “11”.  

  62. 62

    See 10 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1401.  

  63. 63

    See 11 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1401.  

  64. 64

    See 12 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1401–1402.  

  65. 65

    See 13 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1402.  

  66. 66

    See 14 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1402–1403.  

  67. 67

    See 15 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1403.  

  68. 68

    See 16 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1403.  

  69. 69

    See 17 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1403.  

  70. 70

    See 23 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1403.  

  71. 71

    See 24 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1403–1404.  

  72. 72

    See 26 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1404.  

  73. 73

    TEXT: The following insertions were written sideways in the left margin.  

  74. 74

    See 1 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1404.  

  75. 75

    See 2 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1404.  

  76. 76

    See 3 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  77. 77

    See 4 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  78. 78

    See 5 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  79. 79

    See 6 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  80. 80

    See 7 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  81. 81

    See 10 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1405.  

  82. 82

    See 11 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1405–1406.  

  83. 83

    See 13 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1406.  

  84. 84

    See 15 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1406.  

  85. 85

    See 16 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1406–1408.  

  86. 86

    See 20 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1408–1413.  

  87. 87

    TEXT: Richards wrote the following notation in the left margin: “where are the H Council minutes?”  

  88. 88

    See 21 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1413.  

  89. 89

    See 23 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1413.  

  90. 90

    See 25 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1413.  

  91. 91

    See 28 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1413.  

  92. 92

    See 29 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1413–1414.  

  93. 93

    See 30 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  94. 94

    See 31 Oct. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  95. 95

    See 1 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  96. 96

    See 2 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  97. 97

    See 3 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  98. 98

    See 4 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1414.  

  99. 99

    See 5 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1414–1415.  

  100. 100

    See 6 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  101. 101

    See 7 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  102. 102

    See 8 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  103. 103

    See 9 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  104. 104

    See 10–12 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  105. 105

    See 10–12 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  106. 106

    See 13 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1415.  

  107. 107

    See 14 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1415–1420.  

  108. 108

    See 15 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1420–1421.  

  109. 109

    See 16 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  110. 110

    See 17 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  111. 111

    See 21 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  112. 112

    See 22 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  113. 113

    See 23 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  114. 114

    See 24 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1421.  

  115. 115

    See 26 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1421–1422.  

  116. 116

    See 27 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1422.  

  117. 117

    See 28 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1422–1423.  

  118. 118

    See 29 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1423.  

  119. 119

    See 30 Nov. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1423.  

  120. 120

    See 1 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1423–1424.  

  121. 121

    See 2 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  122. 122

    See 3 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  123. 123

    See 4 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  124. 124

    See 5 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  125. 125

    See 6 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  126. 126

    See 7 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  127. 127

    See 8 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1424.  

  128. 128

    See 9 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1424–1427.  

  129. 129

    TEXT: The following insertion was written sideways in the left margin, keyed with an asterisk to where it should be inserted in the text.  

  130. 130

    See 10 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1427.  

  131. 131

    See 13 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1427.  

  132. 132

    See 14 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1427.  

  133. 133

    See 15 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1427–1428.  

  134. 134

    See 17 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1428.  

  135. 135

    See 20 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1428–1429.  

  136. 136

    See 21 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1429.  

  137. 137

    TEXT: The following insertion was written sideways in the left margin. The insertion has been canceled with a large “X” over the text, but Richards made a note that it was “Erased th[r]ough mistake, so it is presented here without the cancellation mark.  

  138. 138

    See 22 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1429.  

  139. 139

    See 23 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1429.  

  140. 140

    See 24 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1429–1430.  

  141. 141

    See 25 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1430.  

  142. 142

    See 26 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1430.  

  143. 143

    See 27 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1430.  

  144. 144

    See 28 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1430.  

  145. 145

    See 29 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1430–1431.  

  146. 146

    See 30 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1431.  

  147. 147

    See 31 Dec. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, pp. 1431–1433.  

  148. 148

    See 28 Sept. 1842 entry in JS History, vol. D-1, p. 1433.